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Table 3.  Number and percentage of public secondary schools reporting physical assaults with the number of incidents reported, by selected school characteristics: 1999–2000


School characteristic Rape or attempted rape1   Sexual battery other than rape2   Physical attack or fight3 with a weapon4   Physical attack or fight3 without a weapon4
Number of schools Percent of schools Number of incidents   Number of schools Percent of schools Number of incidents   Number of schools Percent of schools Number of incidents   Number of schools Percent of schools Number of incidents
All public secondary schools 329 3 360   739 6 2,122   1,139 10 2,377   10,235 87 146,411
                               
Enrollment size                              
Less than 300 # # #   # # #   100 5 100   1,322 67 5,240
300-499   50 3 50   102 5 252   1,539 82 8,450
500-999 64 2 64   94 3 94   212 7 303   2,872 92 30,283
1,000 or more234 5 265   595 12 1,977   725 15 1,723   4,501 94 102,439
                               
Urbanicity                              
City 121 5 133   346 15 1,498   457 19 1,136   2,080 89 45,764
Urban fringe 157 4 176   182 5 393   403 11 825   3,539 93 61,639
Town 51 3 51   55 3 55   67 4 136   1,637 92 16,068
Rural # # #   156 4 176   212 5 280   2,978 77 22,940
                               
Crime level where students live5                              
High   70 15 201   118 25 276   434 93 8,480
Moderate 78 4 90   155 8 234   333 18 795   1,704 90 37,725
Low 123 2 131   395 5 554   408 5 643   6,717 85 75,723
Mixed 81 5 93   119 8 1,132   249 17 501   1,332 90 22,155
                               
Percent minority enrollment5                              
0-5 percent 50 1 50   80 2 80   160 4 260   3,035 83 26,935
6-20 percent 55 2 63   153 6 186   157 6 346   2,525 92 29,772
21-50 percent 74 3 74   227 9 1,285   345 14 619   2,214 88 35,510
More than 50 percent 149 6 173   270 10 553   476 18 1,152   2,292 87 53,086
                               
Percent of students eligible for free/reduced-price lunch                              
0-20 percent 117 2 124   271 6 1,329   412 9 672   4,328 90 50,542
21-50 percent 76 2 76   325 7 459   391 8 1,047   4,014 86 61,608
More than 50 percent 136 6 160   143 6 334   336 14 659   1,892 82 34,261
                               
Percent of students below 15th percentile on standardized tests                              
0-5 percent 32 1 32   172 5 208   165 5 216   3,009 87 31,014
6-15 percent 173 3 180   324 6 1,420   433 8 960   4,633 86 60,885
More than 15 percent 124 4 148   243 8 494   540 19 1,202   2,593 90 54,513
                               
Percent of students likely to attend college                              
0-35 percent 55 2 62   136 5 244   278 11 576   2,242 85 32,574
36-60 percent 182 5 182   262 7 1,343   422 11 1,128   3,222 87 53,488
More than 60 percent 91 2 116   341 6 535   438 8 673   4,771 88 60,349
                               
Percent of students who consider academic achievement important                              
0-25 percent     110 12 199   790 89 9,952
26-50 percent 97 4 97   131 5 253   144 6 390   2,133 86 29,230
51-75 percent 125 3 145   334 8 1,446   469 12 1,105   3,499 87 54,912
More than 75 percent 97 2 109   254 6 364   416 9 684   3,813 87 52,317
                               
Percent male enrollment                              
0-44 percent   82 7 100   107 10 194   757 68 8,706
45-55 percent 290 3 321   600 6 1,936   962 10 2,046   8,686 89 126,572
More than 55 percent   58 6 85   69 7 138   803 85 11,133
                               
Student/teacher ratio5,6                              
Less than 12 40 1 40   125 4 160   195 5 259   2,828 79 26,483
12-16 135 3 159   159 4 316   431 10 845   3,628 89 49,081
More than 16 103 3 111   398 12 1,580   448 13 1,029   3,190 93 62,226
                               
Number of classroom changes5                              
0-3 changes     34 7 46   395 84 5,190
4-6 changes 163 3 163   462 8 1,692   526 9 1,224   5,251 91 75,099
More than 6 changes 129 3 153   242 5 377   507 11 880   3,899 82 57,025
                               
Use of paid law enforcement7                              
Regular use 315 3 347   739 7 2,122   1,085 10 2,323   9,418 90 143,134
No regular use   # # #     817 64 3,277
                               
Number of serious discipline problems8                              
No problems   122 2 164   187 4 392   3,855 79 30,710
1 problem 85 3 85   180 7 1,136   326 12 651   2,291 88 28,345
2 problems 95 5 115   149 7 231   226 11 317   1,910 96 33,182
3 or more problems 127 5 139   287 12 592   399 17 1,017   2,179 94 54,173
                               
Transfers as percentage of enrollment5,9                              
0 to 6 percent 66 2 66   155 4 199   276 7 591   3,133 80 31,994
6 to 11 percent 77 3 77   110 4 189   233 9 406   2,279 86 22,674
11 to 21 percent 75 3 75   148 6 330   262 11 467   2,099 89 36,191
21 percent or more 66 3 90   256 11 1,317   302 13 643   2,202 96 44,855
                               
Prevalence of schoolwide disruptions5,10                              
No disruptions 195 2 195   471 6 765   741 9 1,245   7,109 87 91,071
Any disruptions 111 4 130   202 7 1,210   332 12 932   2,422 86 44,249
                               
Percent of students absent without excuses                              
None   # # #   76 7 88   796 75 5,871
1-2 percent 58 1 58   183 5 286   224 6 450   3,393 86 34,742
3-5 percent 47 1 47   272 8 351   310 9 636   3,067 87 41,286
6-10 percent 146 6 165   150 6 1,143   351 15 854   2,101 92 41,324
More than 10 percent 61 6 73   133 14 341   177 18 349   878 91 23,187
# Rounds to zero.
‡ Reporting standards not met.
1 Rape was defined for respondents as, "forced sexual intercourse (vaginal, anal, or oral penetration). This includes penetration from a foreign object."
2 Sexual battery was defined for respondents as an, "incident that includes threatened rape, fondling, indecent liberties, child molestation, or sodomy. Classification of these incidents should take into consideration the age and developmentally appropriate behavior of the offender(s)."
3 Physical attack or fight was defined for respondents as an, "actual and intentional touching or striking of another person against his or her will, or the intentional causing of bodily harm to an individual."
4 Weapon was defined for respondents as, "any instrument or object used with the intent to threaten, injure, or kill. Includes look-alikes if they are used to threaten others."
5 Some schools are omitted from these categories because of missing data on their school characteristics. For this reason, the detailed results do not sum to the totals. See appendix J of 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) Detailed Data Documentation (NCES 2004-307) for further information.
6 Student/teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time equivalent teachers. The total number of full-time equivalent teachers is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers, including special education teachers, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
7 Schools were included as regularly using paid law enforcement if they reported the use of paid law enforcement during any of the following times: at any time during school hours, while students were arriving or leaving, at selected school activities (e.g., athletic and social events, open houses, science fairs), or at any other time that the respondent specified.
8 Serious discipline problems is a count of discipline problems reported by principals. These discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, and student acts of disrespect for teachers. If a principal reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems. Undesirable gang activities and undesirable cult or extremist group activities were also counted once as a problem if the principal reported that these events occurred at all in their school.
9 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school, divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
10 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as bomb threats or anthrax threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. "At school/at your school" was defined for respondents as including activities happening in school buildings, on school grounds, on school buses, and at places that are holding school-sponsored events or activities. Respondents were instructed to, unless the survey specified otherwise, only respond for those times that were during normal school hours or when school activities/events were in session. Secondary schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 9 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 12.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2000.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education