Skip Navigation
small NCES header image

Table 4.  Number and percentage of public middle schools reporting threats of physical attack and robbery with the number of incidents reported, by selected school characteristics: 1999–2000


School characteristic Threat of attack with a weapon1   Threat of attack without a weapon1   Robbery2 with a weapon1   Robbery2 without a weapon1
Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
All public middle schools 2,571 17 6,552   10,229 67 175,615   70 # 83   1,255 8 6,474
                               
Enrollment size                              
Less than 300 342 13 822   1,277 47 13,769    
300–499 433 13 841   2,119 63 23,330   # # #   222 7 953
500–999 1,403 19 3,720   5,424 75 111,892     703 10 3,079
1,000 or more393 20 1,170   1,409 74 26,624     252 13 1,804
                               
Urbanicity                              
City 633 19 2,245   2,501 74 51,793   35 1 48   370 11 1,984
Urban fringe 994 18 2,490   3,575 67 75,605   # # #   504 9 3,105
Town 338 14 684   1,802 73 22,456   # # #   99 4 360
Rural 606 15 1,133   2,351 58 25,762     282 7 1,025
                               
Crime level where students live3                              
High 259 34 1,250   637 89 18,610     142 19 911
Moderate 334 13 1,301   1,746 68 39,382     202 8 926
Low 1,528 16 2,945   6,277 64 77,104     619 6 2,660
Mixed 450 22 1,056   1,519 74 40,368   # # #   292 14 1,976
                               
Percent minority enrollment3                              
0–5 percent 708 16 1,398   2,604 60 24,379   # # #   209 5 692
6–20 percent 700 18 1,932   2,799 72 41,717   # # #   189 5 1,030
21–50 percent 450 13 1,271   2,471 71 50,545     347 10 1,863
More than 50 percent 699 20 1,937   2,241 66 55,289   60 2 73   467 14 2,460
                               
Percent of students eligible for free/reduced-price lunch                              
0–20 percent 813 17 1,869   2,806 61 30,818   # # #   192 4 563
21–50 percent 1,060 17 2,317   4,446 70 88,195     542 9 3,170
More than 50 percent 699 16 2,366   2,977 69 56,602     521 12 2,741
                               
Percent of students below 15th percentile on standardized tests                              
0–5 percent 544 13 1,393   2,642 63 34,508     219 5 1,365
6–15 percent 1,318 20 3,114   4,533 68 71,771   # # #   513 8 2,203
More than 15 percent 709 16 2,044   3,055 69 69,336     523 12 2,906
                               
Percent of students likely to attend college                              
0–35 percent 721 17 2,420   3,167 73 60,951     483 11 2,370
36–60 percent 817 14 2,099   3,752 67 55,829     503 9 2,857
More than 60 percent 1,034 19 2,032   3,310 62 58,836     269 5 1,246
                               
Percent of students who consider academic achievement important                              
0–25 percent 286 17 1,052   1,198 73 21,697   # # #   127 8 797
26–50 percent 647 20 2,098   2,448 74 56,963     346 10 2,566
51–75 percent 917 18 1,874   3,431 66 52,093     535 10 2,134
More than 75 percent 721 14 1,527   3,153 61 44,863     247 5 976
                               
Percent male enrollment                              
0–44 percent 250 12 1,097   1,180 57 17,798     157 8 1,401
45–55 percent 1,985 17 5,003   8,236 69 149,418   57 # 70   1,021 9 4,692
More than 55 percent 337 25 452   813 62 8,400   # # #   76 6 381
                               
Student/teacher ratio3,4                              
Less than 12 859 18 1,612   2,953 64 44,815     193 4 1,184
12–16 789 14 1,775   3,939 70 66,178     381 7 2,105
More than 16 860 20 3,101   2,851 67 50,808     539 13 2,375
                               
Number of classroom changes3                              
0–3 changes 84 9 100   458 47 6,068     47 5 159
4–6 changes 869 16 2,257   3,594 66 65,565     580 11 2,732
More than 6 changes 1,266 18 3,032   5,040 71 88,655     503 7 2,990
                               
Use of paid law enforcement5                              
Regular use 1,854 18 4,825   7,582 73 140,977   70 1 83   1,221 12 6,426
No regular use 717 15 1,727   2,648 55 34,639   # # #  
                               
Number of serious discipline problems6                              
No problems 510 9 1,297   2,976 54 25,957   # # #   209 4 1,143
1 problem 608 16 1,286   2,371 64 35,689   # # #   229 6 1,159
2 problems 526 23 1,474   1,601 70 31,245     308 13 1,181
3 or more problems 927 24 2,495   3,282 87 82,724     508 13 2,991
                               
Transfers as percentage of enrollment3,7                              
0 to 6 percent 568 15 929   2,297 60 27,939   # # #   209 5 1,114
6 to 11 percent 572 17 1,359   2,434 72 28,802     409 12 1,621
11 to 21 percent 792 21 2,300   2,586 70 51,635     231 6 1,065
21 percent or more 559 14 1,491   2,604 66 62,466     308 8 2,048
                               
Prevalence of schoolwide disruptions3,8                              
No disruptions 1,778 15 3,849   7,847 66 128,198   70 1 83   658 6 3,101
Any disruptions 582 23 2,096   1,851 76 40,711   # # #   533 21 3,042
                               
Percent of students absent without excuses                              
None 438 16 1,180   1,790 65 25,354   # # #   98 4 326
1–2 percent 972 15 2,177   4,072 65 61,690     426 7 1,994
3–5 percent 705 18 1,449   2,485 69 41,748     394 11 1,604
6–10 percent 367 17 1,544   1,476 72 30,676     245 12 1,288
More than 10 percent 89 17 201   407 80 16,148   # # #   92 17 1,262
# Rounds to zero.
‡ Reporting standards not met.
1 Weapon was defined for respondents as, "any instrument or object used with the intent to threaten, injure, or kill. Includes look-alikes if they are used to threaten others."
2 Robbery was defined for respondents as, "the taking or attempting to take anything of value that is owned by another person or organization, under confrontational circumstances by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear. A key difference between robbery and theft/larceny is that robbery involves a threat or battery."
3 Some schools are omitted from these categories because of missing data on their school characteristics. For this reason, the detailed results do not sum to the totals. See appendix J of 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) Detailed Data Documentation (NCES 2004-307) for further information.
4 Student/teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time equivalent teachers. The total number of full-time equivalent teachers is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers, including special education teachers, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
5 Schools were included as regularly using paid law enforcement if they reported the use of paid law enforcement during any of the following times: at any time during school hours, while students were arriving or leaving, at selected school activities (e.g., athletic and social events, open houses, science fairs), or at any other time that the respondent specified.
6 Serious discipline problems is a count of discipline problems reported by principals. These discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, and student acts of disrespect for teachers. If a principal reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems. Undesirable gang activities and undesirable cult or extremist group activities were also counted once as a problem if the principal reported that these events occurred at all in their school.
7 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school, divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
8 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as bomb threats or anthrax threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. "At school/at your school" was defined for respondents as including activities happening in school buildings, on school grounds, on school buses, and at places that are holding school-sponsored events or activities. Respondents were instructed to, unless the survey specified otherwise, only respond for those times that were during normal school hours or when school activities/events were in session. Middle schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 4 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 9.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2000.


Would you like to help us improve our products and website by taking a short survey?

YES, I would like to take the survey

or

No Thanks

The survey consists of a few short questions and takes less than one minute to complete.
National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education