Skip Navigation
small NCES header image

Table 22.  Percentage of public primary schools reporting the use of selected violence prevention program components, by selected school characteristics: School year 2005–06
  Percentage of schools using selected violence prevention program components 
School characteristic Pre-
vention curri-
culum, instruc-
tion, or train-
ing for students1
  Behav-
ioral or behavior modi-
fication inter-
vention for stu-
dents
  Counsel-
ing, social work, psycho-
logical, or therapeutic activity for students
  Individual attention, mentoring, tutoring, or coach-
ing of students by stu-
dents or adults
  Recrea-
tional, enrich-
ment, or leisure activities for students
  Students’ involvement in resolving student conduct problems2   Programs to promote a sense of com-
munity or social inte-
gration among students
  Hotline or tipline for stu-
dents to report problems
 
All public schools  90   94   92   92   83   57   80   19  
                                 
Enrollment size                                 
Less than 300  86   91   89   88   77   58   72   14  
300–499  92   93   94   93   83   58   81   17  
500–999  92   96   92   94   86   54   84   23  
1,000 or more  86   93   87   96   87   76   76   34  
                                 
Urbanicity                                 
City  89   93   92   94   88   66   82   21  
Urban fringe  94   95   93   95   83   52   83   16  
Town  90   94   93   91   86   55   76   18 !
Rural  86   92   91   87   76   55   73   20  
                                 
Crime level where students live3                                 
High  93   96   91   92   84   58   78   24  
Moderate  90   97   93   94   85   61   81   25  
Low  90   91   91   91   81   56   80   17  
Mixed  92   97   94   94   88   58   80   15  
                                 
Percent minority enrollment4                                 
Less than 5 percent  86   91   89   92   78   56   72   23  
5 to less than 20 percent  91   91   94   86   83   54   80   17  
20 to less than 50 percent  94   97   92   95   82   55   81   15  
50 percent or more  89   94   92   94   86   62   81   20  
                                 
Percent of students
eligible for free or
reduced-price lunch 
                               
0–20 percent  90   89   90   87   85   56   82   15  
21–50 percent  92   95   94   95   80   54   78   18  
More than 50 percent  89   95   92   93   83   60   79   21  
                                 
Percent of students below 15th
percentile on standardized tests 
                               
0–5 percent  89   90   90   92   81   59   79   16  
6–15 percent  91   96   94   92   86   55   84   19  
More than 15 percent  91   96   91   93   80   58   74   23  
                                 
Percent of students likely
to attend college 
                               
0–35 percent  92   96   93   92   79   55   75   21  
36–60 percent  86   92   93   90   84   52   79   18  
More than 60 percent  92   93   90   94   85   63   84   18  
                                 
Percent of students who consider
academic achievement important 
                               
0–25 percent  88   100   88   92   78   56   65   24 !
26–50 percent  91   92   91   90   77   48   77   16  
51–75 percent  84   94   94   93   86   55   77   21  
More than 75 percent  93   93   92   92   84   62   84   18  
                                 
Percent male enrollment                                 
0–44 percent  94   100   98   97   96   60   98   20 !
45–55 percent  90   92   92   93   83   57   79   19  
More than 55 percent  89   98   89   85   77   60   75   18  
                                 
Student-to-FTE ratio5                                 
Less than 12 students  90   95   93   93   82   59   80   19  
12–16 students  89   90   93   91   83   54   81   19  
More than 16 students  92   94   89   93   84   57   78   18  
                                 
Number of classroom changes6                                 
0–3 changes  87   92   90   89   79   59   77   21  
4–6 changes  92   94   95   94   87   55   83   19  
More than 6 changes  93   96   90   96   82   61   77   9 !
                                 
Regular use of law enforcement7                                 
Regular use  94   97   95   98   92   65   85   28  
No regular use  89   92   91   90   79   55   78   15  
                                 
Number of serious
discipline problems8 
                               
No problems  90   93   91   92   81   55   81   18  
1 problem  88   93   95   95   90   67   76   23  
2 problems  94   98   98   96   83   58   79   24  
3 or more problems  87   100   92   87   86   62   66   18 !
                                 
Transfers as a percentage
of enrollment9 
                               
Less than 6 percent  90   92   90   86   83   55   77   9  
6 to less than 11 percent  95   93   92   96   84   60   87   25  
11 to less than 21 percent  86   91   92   90   80   56   77   18  
21 percent or more  91   96   93   95   84   58   79   20  
                                 
Prevalence of schoolwide
disruptions10 
                               
No disruptions  90   93   92   92   83   57   79   18  
Any disruptions  100   100   94   97   81   60   90   32  
                                 
Percent of students
absent on a daily basis 
                               
0–2 percent  90   95   86   89   83   61   85   12  
3–5 percent  91   93   94   94   83   59   82   21  
6–10 percent  89   94   93   92   81   52   72   17  
More than 10 percent  85   95   86   85   83   59   77   18  
                                 
Prevalence of violent incidents11                                 
No violent incidents  89   93   88   87   82   61   80   14  
Any violent incidents  91   94   94   95   83   55   80   21  
! Interpret data with caution. The standard error for this estimate is from 30 percent to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.
1 For example, social skills training.
2 For example, conflict resolution, peer mediation, or student court.
3 Respondents were asked, "How would you describe the crime level in the area(s) in which your students live?" Response options included "high level of crime," "moderate level of crime," "low level of crime," and "students come from areas with very different levels of crime."
4 Responding schools that did not have race/ethnicity on the sampling frame (2 percent of schools) are excluded from the base.
5 Student-to-FTE ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time-equivalent teachers and aides. The total number of full-time-equivalent teachers and aides is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers and aides, including special education teachers and aides, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
6 Respondents were asked, "How many classroom changes do most students make in a typical day?" Responses exclude morning arrival and afternoon departure.
7 Respondents were asked, "During the 2005–2006 school year, did you have any sworn law enforcement officers, security guards, or security personnel present at your school at least once a week?"
8 Serious discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student sexual harassment of other students, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, student acts of disrespect for teachers, gang activities, and cult or extremist group activities. If a respondent reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems.
9 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
10 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as death threats, bomb threats, and chemical, biological, or radiological threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
11 Violent incidents include rape or attempted rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with or without a weapon, threat of physical attack with or without a weapon, and robbery with or without a weapon.
NOTE: Responses were provided by the principal or the person most knowledgeable about crime and safety issues at the school. Detail may not sum to totals, because schools may have reported using more than one of these violence prevention program components. Primary schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not higher than grade 3 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 8.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), 2005–06 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2006.


Would you like to help us improve our products and website by taking a short survey?

YES, I would like to take the survey

or

No Thanks

The survey consists of a few short questions and takes less than one minute to complete.
National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education