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Table 8.  Number and percentage of public elementary schools reporting violent and other incidents of hate crimes with the number of incidents reported, by selected school characteristics: 1999–2000


School characteristic Violent incidents1   Serious violent incidents2   Theft3   Other incidents4
Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
All public elementary schools                              
806 2 8,239     # # #   1,081 2 2,146
                               
Enrollment size                               
Less than 300  # # #   # # #   # # #   330 3 399
300–499      # # #   302 2 387
500–999  628 3 7,992   # # #   # # #   449 2 1,360
1,000 or more  # # #   # # #   # # #   # # #
                               
Urbanicity                               
City  370 3 1,260   # # #   # # #   423 3 1,403
Urban fringe    # # #   # # #   396 2 481
Town  251 5 322     # # #  
Rural    # # #   # # #  
                               
Crime level where students live5                               
High  233 6 3,902   # # #   # # #  
Moderate    # # #   # # #   358 4 513
Low  419 1 3,362     # # #   587 2 811
Mixed  # # #   # # #   # # #   # # #
                               
Percent minority enrollment5                               
0–5 percent  350 2 3,224     # # #  
6–20 percent    # # #   # # #  
21–50 percent    # # #   # # #   354 4 423
More than 50 percent  230 2 1,052   # # #   # # #   540 4 1,381
                               
Percent of students eligible
for free/reduced-price lunch 
                             
                             
0–20 percent      # # #   257 2 412
21–50 percent  240 2 3,183   # # #   # # #  
More than 50 percent  387 2 4,877   # # #   # # #   648 3 1,489
                               
Percent of students below 15th percentile on standardized tests                               
0–5 percent  # # #   # # #   # # #   256 2 411
6–15 percent  419 2 3,291     # # #   264 1 419
More than 15 percent  387 3 4,948   # # #   # # #   562 4 1,315
                               
Percent of students likely to attend college                               
0–35 percent  316 2 4,806   # # #   # # #   400 2 1,241
36–60 percent  420 2 3,363     # # #   603 3 672
More than 60 percent    # # #   # # #  
                               
Percent of students who
consider academic achievement
important 
                             
0–25 percent    # # #   # # #   # # #
26–50 percent  233 2 3,973   # # #   # # #  
51–75 percent  400 3 631     # # #   600 4 1,354
More than 75 percent    # # #   # # #   242 1 468
                               
Percent male enrollment                               
0–44 percent  259 4 7,390   # # #   # # #   272 4 342
45–55 percent  476 1 707     # # #   587 2 1,513
More than 55 percent    # # #   # # #  
                               
Student/teacher ratio5,6                               
Less than 12    # # #   # # #  
12–16  552 3 1,444     # # #   480 3 706
More than 16    # # #   # # #   493 3 1,332
                               
Number of classroom changes5                               
0–3 changes  212 1 941   # # #   # # #   380 2 450
4–6 changes  594 3 7,298     # # #   701 3 1,525
More than 6 changes  # # #   # # #   # # #   # # #
                               
Use of paid law enforcement7                               
Regular use  386 2 4,876   # # #   # # #   439 2 1,503
No regular use  420 1 3,363     # # #   643 2 643
                               
Number of serious discipline problems8                               
No problems  179     # # #   471 1 695
1 problem  # # #   # # #   # # #  
2 problems  142   # # #   # # #  
3 or more problems  556 13 7,918   # # #   # # #   317 10 1,087
                               
Transfers as percentage of enrollment5,9                               
0 to 6 percent  329 3 559     # # #  
6 to 11 percent  171 2 3,045   # # #   # # #  
11 to 21 percent    # # #   # # #   403 3 489
21 percent or more  233 1 3,902   # # #   # # #   284 2 353
                               
Prevalence of schoolwide disruptions5,10                               
No disruptions  517 1 7,221     # # #   768 2 1,079
Any disruptions  289 13 1,018   # # #   # # #   # # #
                               
Percent of students absent without excuses                               
None  # # #   # # #   # # #  
1–2 percent  249 1 389     # # #   534 3 1,304
3–5 percent  248 2 3,050   # # #   # # #  
6–10 percent    # # #   # # #  
More than 10 percent    # # #   # # #  
# Rounds to zero.
‡ Reporting standards not met.
1 Violent incidents include rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with or without a weapon, threat of physical attack with or without a weapon, and robbery with or without a weapon.
2 Serious violent incidents include rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with a weapon, threat of physical attack with a weapon, and robbery with or without a weapon.
3 Theft/larceny (taking things over $10 without personal confrontation) was defined for respondents as, "the unlawful taking of another person's property without personal confrontation, threat, violence, or bodily harm. Included are pocket picking, stealing purse or backpack (if left unattended or no force was used to take it from owner), theft from a building, theft from a motor vehicle or motor vehicle parts or accessories, theft of bicycles, theft from vending machines, and all other types of thefts."
4 Other incidents include possession of a firearm or explosive device, possession of a knife or sharp object, distribution of illegal drugs, possession or use of alcohol or illegal drugs, sexual harassment, or vandalism.
5 Some schools are omitted from these categories because of missing data on their school characteristics. For this reason, the detailed results do not sum to the totals. See appendix J of 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) Detailed Data Documentation (NCES 2004-307) for further information.
6 Student/teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time equivalent teachers. The total number of full-time equivalent teachers is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers, including special education teachers, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
7 Schools were included as regularly using paid law enforcement if they reported the use of paid law enforcement during any of the following times: at any time during school hours, while students were arriving or leaving, at selected school activities (e.g., athletic and social events, open houses, science fairs), or at any other time that the respondent specified.
8 Serious discipline problems is a count of discipline problems reported by principals. These discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, and student acts of disrespect for teachers. If a principal reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems. Undesirable gang activities and undesirable cult or extremist group activities were also counted once as a problem if the principal reported that these events occurred at all in their school.
9 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school, divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
10 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as bomb threats or anthrax threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. "At school/at your school" was defined for respondents as including activities happening in school buildings, on school grounds, on school buses, and at places that are holding school-sponsored events or activities. Respondents were instructed to, unless the survey specified otherwise, only respond for those times that were during normal school hours or when school activities/events were in session. A hate crime was defined for respondents as, "a criminal offense or threat against a person, property, or society that is motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender's bias against a race, color, national origin, ethnicity, gender, religion, disability, or sexual orientation." Elementary schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not higher than grade 3 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 8.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2000.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education