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Table 4.  Number and percentage of public elementary schools reporting threats of physical attack and robbery with the number of incidents reported, by selected school characteristics: 1999–2000


School characteristic Threat of attack with a weapon1   Threat of attack without a weapon1   Robbery2 with a weapon1   Robbery2 without a weapon1
Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
All public elementary schools  4,456 9 9,125   21,229 43 303,742     1,521 3 7,449
                               
Enrollment size                               
Less than 300  497 4 723   4,998 38 20,153   # # #  
300–499  1,022 6 1,501   7,028 43 101,607     358 2 2,117
500–999  2,754 15 6,619   8,632 46 170,989   # # #   882 5 4,596
1,000 or more  183 11 281   571 35 10,994   # # #  
                               
Urbanicity                               
City  1,531 12 3,539   6,574 50 110,752     1,015 8 3,129
Urban fringe  1,836 11 3,069   5,936 36 75,387   # # #   313 2 1,982
Town  738 13 2,024   2,390 44 44,055   # # #   # # #
Rural  352 2 493   6,329 44 73,548   # # #  
                               
Crime level where students live3                               
High  689 16 2,085   2,814 67 104,500   # # #   514 12 2,251
Moderate  1,094 12 1,590   4,052 43 92,248   # # #   488 5 4,016
Low  2,419 8 4,628   12,585 39 96,024   # # #   309 1 625
Mixed  254 6 822   1,777 44 10,970    
                               
Percent minority enrollment3                               
0–5 percent  675 5 988   6,918 49 46,170   # # #   311 2 843
6–20 percent  1,150 11 3,118   3,404 32 51,350   # # #  
21–50 percent  907 9 1,261   3,710 38 72,612   # # #   261 3 2,776
More than 50 percent  1,724 12 3,758   6,732 46 129,431     795 5 1,570
                               
Percent of students eligible for free/reduced-price lunch                               
0–20 percent  701 6 1,920   4,648 38 46,302   # # #  
21–50 percent  1,296 8 1,885   6,367 40 82,653   # # #  
More than 50 percent  2,458 11 5,319   10,213 47 174,788     1,212 6 6,825
                               
Percent of students below 15th percentile on standardized tests                               
0–5 percent  1,292 8 1,983   5,101 33 40,279   # # #  
6–15 percent  1,334 7 3,215   8,654 46 99,349   # # #   405 2 734
More than 15 percent  1,830 12 3,927   7,473 49 164,114     976 6 6,222
                               
Percent of students likely to attend college                               
0–35 percent  1,940 12 3,762   8,741 53 150,950     914 6 5,979
36–60 percent  1,446 8 3,731   7,941 44 128,745   # # #   401 2 1,051
More than 60 percent  1,070 7 1,632   4,547 30 24,047   # # #   206 1 419
                               
Percent of students who consider academic achievement important                               
0–25 percent  441 13 1,429   1,982 56 30,387   # # #  
26–50 percent  1,295 12 2,268   6,881 62 86,167     820 7 6,278
51–75 percent  1,027 7 1,452   6,194 41 99,704   # # #   356 2 603
More than 75 percent  1,693 9 3,976   6,172 31 87,484   # # #   195 1 268
                               
Percent male enrollment                               
0–44 percent    2,582 41 44,744   # # #   218 3 1,486
45–55 percent  4,193 11 8,667   16,060 43 238,206     951 3 4,129
More than 55 percent    2,587 40 20,793   # # #   352 5 1,834
                               
Student/teacher ratio3,4                               
Less than 12  868 5 1,572   7,008 43 69,650     324 2 2,909
12–16  1,814 11 4,144   7,240 45 117,536   # # #   363 2 1,867
More than 16  1,774 12 3,409   6,420 43 112,681   # # #   715 5 2,555
                               
Number of classroom changes3                               
0–3 changes  1,299 6 3,093   6,759 34 83,765     1,001 5 2,122
4–6 changes  2,542 11 5,028   10,689 47 183,295   # # #   439 2 4,115
More than 6 changes  555 9 945   3,310 55 31,707   # # #  
                               
Use of paid law enforcement5                               
Regular use  2,039 11 5,399   9,042 49 177,249   # # #   1,169 6 5,601
No regular use  2,417 8 3,726   12,187 39 126,493     352 1 1,849
                               
Number of serious discipline problems6                               
No problems  2,265 7 3,080   11,699 36 76,895     438 1 828
1 problem  737 8 1,742   4,092 47 45,008   # # #   291 3 754
2 problems  761 18 2,367   2,556 60 87,530   # # #   338 8 1,747
3 or more problems  693 17 1,936   2,882 69 94,310   # # #   453 11 4,120
                               
Transfers as percentage of enrollment3,7                               
0 to 6 percent  434 4 1,055   3,203 32 26,217   # # #   470 5 1,242
6 to 11 percent  973 9 1,314   4,099 38 31,537     203 2 1,334
11 to 21 percent  1,071 9 3,024   5,035 44 64,170   # # #   394 3 883
21 percent or more  1,924 12 3,623   8,096 52 161,011   # # #   454 3 3,990
                               
Prevalence of schoolwide disruptions3,8                               
No disruptions  4,155 9 8,764   18,865 43 263,711     1,151 3 4,686
Any disruptions    1,210 53 18,764   # # #   302 13 2,626
                               
Percent of students absent without excuses                               
None  637 6 849   3,383 33 24,708   # # #  
1–2 percent  1,614 8 3,911   9,640 46 103,845   # # #   543 3 2,268
3–5 percent  1,525 12 3,431   6,326 49 106,661   # # #   298 2 674
6–10 percent  406 12 660   1,319 40 39,735     425 13 2,950
More than 10 percent  274 14 274   561 28 28,794   # # #  
# Rounds to zero.
‡ Reporting standards not met.
1 Weapon was defined for respondents as, "any instrument or object used with the intent to threaten, injure, or kill. Includes look-alikes if they are used to threaten others."
2 Robbery was defined for respondents as, "the taking or attempting to take anything of value that is owned by another person or organization, under confrontational circumstances by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear. A key difference between robbery and theft/larceny is that robbery involves a threat or battery."
3 Some schools are omitted from these categories because of missing data on their school characteristics. For this reason, the detailed results do not sum to the totals. See appendix J of 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) Detailed Data Documentation (NCES 2004-307) for further information.
4 Student/teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time equivalent teachers. The total number of full-time equivalent teachers is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers, including special education teachers, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
5 Schools were included as regularly using paid law enforcement if they reported the use of paid law enforcement during any of the following times: at any time during school hours, while students were arriving or leaving, at selected school activities (e.g., athletic and social events, open houses, science fairs), or at any other time that the respondent specified.
6 Serious discipline problems is a count of discipline problems reported by principals. These discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, and student acts of disrespect for teachers. If a principal reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems. Undesirable gang activities and undesirable cult or extremist group activities were also counted once as a problem if the principal reported that these events occurred at all in their school.
7 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school, divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
8 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as bomb threats or anthrax threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. "At school/at your school" was defined for respondents as including activities happening in school buildings, on school grounds, on school buses, and at places that are holding school-sponsored events or activities. Respondents were instructed to, unless the survey specified otherwise, only respond for those times that were during normal school hours or when school activities/events were in session. Elementary schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not higher than grade 3 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 8.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2000.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education