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Table 2.  Number and percentage of public elementary schools reporting violent and other incidents to police with the number of incidents reported, by selected school characteristics: 1999–2000


School characteristic  Violent incidents1    Serious violent incidents2    Theft3    Other incidents4
Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
All public
elementary schools 
                             
10,020 20 48,057   4,189 8 9,205   7,680 15 15,456   18,078 36 67,049
                               
Enrollment size                               
Less than 300  1,249 10 1,726   381 3 491   1,088 8 1,515   3,255 25 7,392
300–499  3,341 20 10,568   1,020 6 2,475   2,368 14 5,190   5,874 36 22,304
500–999  5,103 27 34,142   2,575 14 5,994   3,902 21 7,966   8,041 43 33,633
1,000 or more  328 20 1,620   214 13 245   322 20 784   908 56 3,720
                               
Urbanicity                               
City  4,148 31 30,157   1,929 15 5,320   3,283 25 7,011   6,478 49 34,572
Urban fringe  2,794 17 8,305   1,569 9 2,625   2,219 13 3,942   4,848 29 14,359
Town  1,264 23 5,446   481 9 979   809 15 1,727   2,337 42 6,264
Rural  1,815 13 4,148   210 1 281   1,368 10 2,776   4,415 31 11,854
                               
Crime level where students live5                              
                             
High  2,187 52 22,509   1,057 25 2,553   1,698 40 3,203   2,602 62 19,097
Moderate  2,452 26 8,564   862 9 2,535   1,529 16 3,828   3,860 41 16,403
Low  4,506 14 14,156   1,775 6 2,947   3,762 12 6,587   9,510 30 25,897
Mixed  875 22 2,827   495 12 1,170   690 17 1,838   2,034 50 5,579
                               
Percent minority enrollment5                              
                             
0–5 percent  1,744 12 3,789   239 2 309   1,580 11 2,783   3,685 26 10,777
6–20 percent  1,921 18 8,205   856 8 1,732   1,382 13 2,979   3,678 34 12,842
21–50 percent  1,810 19 7,550   951 10 2,798   1,046 11 2,069   4,007 41 13,902
More than 50 percent  4,424 30 27,910   2,144 15 4,366   3,551 24 6,899   6,476 44 28,933
                               
Percent of students eligible for free/reduced-price lunch                              
                             
                             
0–20 percent  1,800 15 5,994   650 5 1,158   1,394 11 2,371   3,512 28 10,711
21–50 percent  1,988 13 5,456   768 5 972   2,055 13 3,610   5,192 33 14,828
More than 50 percent  6,232 29 36,607   2,772 13 7,075   4,231 19 9,474   9,374 43 41,510
                               
Percent of students below 15th percentile                              
                             
on standardized tests                               
0–5 percent  2,238 14 4,951   858 5 1,144   1,531 10 2,803   4,428 28 9,929
6–15 percent  3,149 17 20,461   810 4 1,672   2,060 11 3,904   5,910 31 23,924
More than 15 percent  4,633 30 22,645   2,521 17 6,389   4,089 27 8,748   7,740 51 33,196
                               
Percent of students likely to attend college                              
                             
0–35 percent  5,279 32 29,429   2,172 13 5,158   3,388 21 6,420   7,507 46 35,643
36–60 percent  3,251 18 14,781   1,104 6 2,532   2,891 16 5,781   6,835 38 21,973
More than 60 percent  1,490 10 3,847   914 6 1,515   1,400 9 3,254   3,736 24 9,433
                             
Percent of students who consider academic achievement important                              
                             
                             
0–25 percent  1,270 36 5,788   353 10 1,186   965 28 2,084   1,933 55 6,170
26–50 percent  3,123 28 14,015   1,763 16 4,074   2,724 24 6,202   5,068 45 25,760
51–75 percent  2,710 18 18,733   638 4 778   1,966 13 3,392   5,462 36 18,892
More than 75 percent  2,918 15 9,521   1,436 7 3,168   2,025 10 3,777   5,615 28 16,228
                               
Percent male enrollment                               
0–44 percent  1,431 23 3,753   407 7 617   902 14 1,795   2,326 37 10,660
45–55 percent  7,448 20 37,392   3,367 9 6,460   5,753 16 10,939   13,650 37 48,658
More than 55 percent  1,141 17 6,912   415 6 2,128   1,024 15 2,722   2,102 32 7,730
                               
Student/teacher ratio5,6                               
Less than 12  3,093 19 19,622   1,103 7 1,731   1,946 12 4,862   5,839 36 22,375
12–16  3,180 20 15,267   1,191 7 3,777   2,784 17 5,707   5,588 35 24,612
More than 16  3,629 24 13,048   1,896 13 3,698   2,949 20 4,887   6,261 42 19,456
                               
Number of classroom changes5                               
0–3 changes  4,138 20 24,069   1,548 8 3,351   3,546 18 6,068   7,223 36 23,260
4–6 changes  4,227 19 15,990   1,925 8 3,236   2,934 13 6,070   8,259 36 32,151
More than 6 changes  1,315 22 7,118   657 11 2,558   949 16 2,816   2,171 36 8,697
                               
Use of paid law enforcement8                               
                             
Regular use  5,694 31 37,793   2,177 12 4,941   4,212 23 9,825   8,365 45 42,964
No regular use  4,326 14 10,264   2,013 6 4,264   3,468 11 5,631   9,713 31 24,085
                               
Number of serious discipline problems8                              
                             
No problems  4,089 12 10,051   1,804 6 2,546   3,370 10 6,493   10,315 32 25,315
1 problem  2,369 27 7,812   658 8 1,226   1,353 15 2,780   2,968 34 10,944
2 problems  1,037 24 19,902   735 17 2,966   1,331 31 2,607   1,966 46 11,766
3 or more problems  2,526 60 10,291   993 24 2,467   1,626 39 3,575   2,829 68 19,025
                               
Transfers as percentage of enrollment5,9                              
                             
0 to 6 percent  1,362 14 3,417   709 7 1,196   1,662 17 4,476   2,804 28 8,825
6 to 11 percent  1,622 15 6,411   510 5 2,181   943 9 1,756   3,074 28 11,785
11 to 21 percent  2,705 23 12,581   1,192 10 2,417   1,975 17 3,756   4,653 40 16,379
21 percent or more  4,042 26 24,855   1,643 11 3,221   2,810 18 5,144   6,689 43 26,935
                               
Prevalence of schoolwide disruptions5,10                              
                             
No disruptions  8,472 19 44,204   3,745 8 8,554   6,575 15 12,639   15,893 36 58,866
Any disruptions  1,002 44 2,367   217 10 424   458 20 1,424   954 42 3,875
                             
Percent of students absent without excuses                              
                             
None  987 10 1,788   471 5 615   583 6 1,307   2,353 23 5,469
1–2 percent  4,639 22 15,506   1,663 8 4,009   2,915 14 5,093   8,019 38 25,411
3–5 percent  2,488 19 10,418   1,180 9 3,261   2,382 18 5,130   5,014 38 20,057
6–10 percent  1,426 43 7,397   611 19 971   1,231 37 2,717   1,843 56 9,236
More than 10 percent  481 24 12,948   265 13 350   568 28 1,208   850 42 6,877
1 Violent incidents include rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with or without a weapon, threat of physical attack with or without a weapon, and robberywith or without a weapon.
2 Serious violent incidents include rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with a weapon, threat of physical attack with a weapon, and robbery with orwithout a weapon.
3 Theft/larceny (taking things over $10 without personal confrontation) was defined for respondents as, "the unlawful taking of another person's property without personalconfrontation, threat, violence, or bodily harm. Included are pocket picking, stealing purse or backpack (if left unattended or no force was used to take it from owner), theft from abuilding, theft from a motor vehicle or motor vehicle parts or accessories, theft of bicycles, theft from vending machines, and all other types of thefts."
4 Other incidents include possession of a firearm or explosive device, possession of a knife or sharp object, distribution of illegal drugs, possession or use of alcohol or illegaldrugs, sexual harassment, or vandalism.
5 Some schools are omitted from these categories because of missing data on their school characteristics. For this reason, the detailed results do not sum to the totals. See appendix J of 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) Detailed Data Documentation (NCES 2004-307) for further information.
6 Student/teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time equivalent teachers. The total number offull-time equivalent teachers is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers, including special education teachers, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
7 Schools were included as regularly using paid law enforcement if they reported the use of paid law enforcement during any of the following times: at any time during school hours,while students were arriving or leaving, at selected school activities (e.g., athletic and social events, open houses, science fairs), or at any other time that the respondent specified.
8 Serious discipline problems is a count of discipline problems reported by principals. These discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student verbalabuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, and student acts of disrespect for teachers. If a principal reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weeklyin their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems. Undesirable gang activities and undesirable cult or extremist group activities were alsocounted once as a problem if the principal reported that these events occurred at all in their school.
9 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school,divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
10 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as bomb threats or anthrax threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms,including false alarms.
NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. "At school/at your school" was defined for respondents as including activities happening in school buildings, on schoolgrounds, on school buses, and at places that are holding school-sponsored events or activities. Respondents were instructed to, unless the survey specified otherwise, onlyrespond for those times that were during normal school hours or when school activities/events were in session. Elementary schools are defined as schools in which thelowest grade is not higher than grade 3 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 8.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2000.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education