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Table 3.  Number and percentage of public schools reporting sexual and physical assaults that occurred at school, the number of sexual and physical assaults, and the rate of sexual and physical assaults per 1,000 students, by selected school characteristics: School year 2003–04—Continued (Return to Table 3)


School characteristic Physical attack or fight with a weapon3,4 Physical attack or fight without a weapon3,4
Num-
ber of
schools
Per-
cent of
schools
Num-
ber of
incidents
Rate per
1,000
students
  Num-
ber of
schools
Per-
cent of
schools
Num-
ber of
incidents
Rate per
1,000
students
All public schools  3,206 4 12,300 0.3   61,709 77 932,082 20.0
                   
Level5                   
Primary  1,440 3 5,000 0.2   33,253 68 420,346 18.6
Middle  613 4 3,382 0.3   13,267 92 296,712 30.3
High school  851 8 3,337 0.3   10,234 95 167,422 14.4
Combined  301 5 580 0.2   4,955 78 47,603 18.0
                   
Enrollment size                   
Less than 300  835 4 3,260 0.8   11,923 63 89,494 22.9
300–499  483 2 1,602 0.2   17,289 74 180,942 18.5
500–999  1,015 4 3,497 0.2   23,920 82 420,069 21.4
1,000 or more  872 10 3,940 0.3   8,577 96 241,577 18.0
                   
Urbanicity                   
City  970 5 5,081 0.4   16,938 84 294,715 21.7
Urban fringe  1,234 5 2,772 0.2   20,129 76 345,132 18.7
Town  496 5 3,043 0.6   8,105 84 93,382 18.8
Rural  506 2 1,404 0.1   16,537 68 198,853 20.4
                   
Crime level where
students live6 
                 
High  515 9 3,190 0.9   5,494 94 119,097 33.2
Moderate  1,179 8 3,715 0.4   13,536 87 279,736 27.9
Low  1,204 2 4,026 0.2   34,411 71 379,009 14.6
Mixed  308 3 1,368 0.2   8,269 77 154,240 21.6
                   
Percent minority
enrollment7 
                 
Less than 5 percent  387 2 1,947 0.3   11,312 66 111,434 15.6
5 to 20 percent  451 2 1,464 0.1   14,304 72 174,977 15.5
20 to 50 percent  524 3 1,409 0.1   14,130 80 218,165 19.7
50 percent or more  1,810 7 7,446 0.5   20,693 85 409,867 25.4
                   
Percent of students
eligible for free or
reduced-price lunch 
                 
0–20 percent  434 2 1,399 0.1   12,327 65 146,342 11.2
21–50 percent  861 3 3,773 0.2   21,928 77 324,346 20.0
More than 50 percent  1,911 6 7,128 0.4   27,454 83 461,394 26.4
                   
Percent of students
below 15th percentile on
standardized tests 
                 
0–5 percent  612 3 1,286 0.1   15,859 68 175,116 13.7
6–15 percent  1,240 4 5,581 0.3   25,955 77 388,207 19.5
More than 15 percent  1,355 6 5,433 0.4   19,895 85 368,759 26.4
                   
Percent of students likely
to attend college 
                 
0–35 percent  1,454 6 4,568 0.3   20,590 80 372,769 27.8
36–60 percent  618 3 2,193 0.2   18,686 83 286,664 21.9
More than 60 percent  1,135 4 5,538 0.3   22,433 69 272,650 13.5
                   
Percent of students who
consider academic
achievement important 
                 
0–25 percent  621 8 2,075 0.5   7,414 90 127,271 31.8
26–50 percent  966 6 3,611 0.4   14,216 82 230,858 24.6
51–75 percent  732 3 3,421 0.2   18,468 79 303,035 21.7
More than 75 percent  887 3 3,193 0.2   21,613 69 270,918 14.0
                   
Percent male enrollment                   
0–44 percent  494 9 1,294 0.5   3,728 68 54,343 20.2
45–55 percent  2,480 4 9,687 0.2   51,744 78 798,166 20.0
More than 55 percent  233 3 1,319 0.3   6,237 70 79,573 19.5
                   
Student-to-teacher ratio8                   
Less than 12 students  1,506 4 4,777 0.3   25,700 72 330,771 21.8
12–16 students  899 3 4,981 0.3   23,790 80 372,897 19.1
More than 16 students  801 5 2,542 0.2   12,219 83 228,414 19.0
                   
Number of classroom
changes9 
                 
0–3 changes  780 4 2,630 0.3   13,870 66 180,911 17.9
4–6 changes  1,531 4 5,455 0.2   28,627 77 436,752 19.8
More than 6 changes  895 4 4,214 0.3   19,212 87 314,419 21.7
                   
Regular use of law
enforcement10 
                 
Regular use  2,229 6 8,574 0.3   29,797 82 574,599 21.0
No regular use  977 2 3,726 0.2   31,912 72 357,483 18.5
                   
Number of serious
discipline problems11 
                 
No problems  1,300 3 4,843 0.2   36,455 70 390,990 14.1
1 problem  776 5 3,792 0.4   11,964 82 189,137 21.6
2 problems  273 4 1,237 0.2   7,161 94 160,730 32.1
3 or more problems  857 13 2,426 0.5   6,129 94 191,225 37.2
                   
Transfers as a percentage
of enrollment12 
                 
0 to 6 percent  571 4 2,331 0.3   11,027 70 120,127 13.4
6 to 11 percent  513 3 2,346 0.2   12,624 72 148,312 15.5
11 to 21 percent  773 3 2,295 0.2   18,296 76 267,706 18.4
21 percent or more  1,349 6 5,328 0.4   19,762 85 395,937 29.2
                   
Prevalence of schoolwide
disruptions13 
                 
No disruptions  2,748 4 9,419 0.2   57,023 76 825,878 19.5
Any disruptions  458 9 2,881 0.6   4,686 92 106,204 23.8
                   
Percent of students
absent on a daily basis 
                 
0–2 percent  77 1 116 #   4,917 63 54,769 16.1
3–5 percent  1,365 3 7,971 0.3   33,382 75 419,621 17.0
6–10 percent  1,518 6 2,889 0.2   19,914 84 384,850 24.6
More than 10 percent  247 6 1,324 0.4   3,496 80 72,843 24.4
# Rounds to zero.
1 Rape was defined for respondents as "forced sexual intercourse (vaginal, anal, or oral penetration). Includes penetration from a foreign object."
2 Sexual battery was defined for respondents as an "incident that includes threatened rape, fondling, indecent liberties, child molestation, or sodomy. Classification of these incidents should take should take into consideration the age and developmentally appropriate behavior of the offender(s)."
3 Physical attack or fight was defined for respondents as an "actual and intentional touching or striking of another person against his or her will, or the intentional causing of bodily harm to an individual."
4 Weapon was defined for respondents as "any instrument or object used with the intent to threaten, injure, or kill. Includes look-alikes if they are used to threaten others."
5 Primary schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not higher than grade 3 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 8. Middle schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 4 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 9. High schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 9 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 12. Combined schools include all other combinations of grades, including K–12 schools.
6 Respondents were asked, "How would you describe the crime level in the area(s) in which your students live?" Response options included "high level of crime," "moderate level of crime," "low level of crime," and "students come from areas with very different levels of crime."
7 These estimates exclude data from Tennessee because schools in this state did not report estimates of student race.
8 Student-to-teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time-equivalent teachers and aides. The total number of full-time-equivalent teachers and aides is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers and aides, including special education teachers and aides, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
9 Respondents were asked, "How many classroom changes do most students make in a typical day?" Responses exclude morning arrival and afternoon departure.
10 Respondents were asked, "During the 2003–2004 school year, did you have any sworn law enforcement officers, security guards, or security personnel present at your school on a regular basis?"
11 Serious discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student sexual harassment of other students, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, student acts of disrespect for teachers, gang activities, and cult or extremist group activities. If a respondent reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems.
12 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
13 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as death threats, bomb threats, and chemical, biological, or radiological threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
NOTE: "At school" was defined for respondents to include activities that happen in school buildings, on school grounds, on school buses, and at places that hold school-sponsored events or activities. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. Reponses were provided by the principal or the person most knowledgeable about crime and safety issues at the school.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2004.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education