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Table 18.  Number and percentage distribution of disciplinary actions taken for use of a weapon other than a firearm, by selected school characteristics: 1999–2000


School characteristic Total offenses   Removals   Transfers to specialized schools1   Out-of-school suspensions   Other   No disciplinary action
Number   Number Percent   Number Percent   Number Percent   Number Percent   Number Percent
All public schools 11,971   1,894 16   1,867 16   4,220 35   3,833 32   158 1
                                 
Level                                
Elementary 5,340       1,550 29   2,817 53   # #
Middle 2,732   316 12   705 26   1,064 39   628 23  
Secondary 3,616   784 22   949 26   1,448 40   298 8   138 4
Combined 283   # #     159 56     # #
                                 
Enrollment size                                
Less than 300 1,391   100 7   111 8   499 36   680 49   # #
300–499 2,212   831 38     535 24   694 31  
500–999 5,295   400 8   692 13   2,024 38   2,143 40  
1,000 or more 3,072   563 18   1,020 33   1,161 38   316 10  
                                 
Urbanicity                                
City 4,451   1,126 25   1,087 24   1,350 30   855 19  
Urban fringe 4,655   457 10   544 12   1,654 36   2,001 43   # #
Town 1,209   208 17     409 34   523 43  
Rural 1,656   103 6   204 12   806 49   454 27  
                                 
Crime level where students live2                                
High 1,068   176 17   712 67   180 17   # #   # #
Moderate 3,565   301 8   503 14   1,560 44   1,163 33  
Low 5,114   1,087 21   446 9   1,897 37   1,577 31  
Mixed 2,151   330 15   205 10   583 27   1,019 47  
                                 
Percent minority enrollment2                                
0–5 percent 2,185   73 3   72 3   594 27   1,358 62  
6–20 percent 2,825   868 31   124 4   939 33   873 31  
21–50 percent 2,557   368 14   528 21   1,375 54   249 10  
More than 50 percent 4,405   585 13   1,142 26   1,311 30   1,353 31  
                                 
Percent of students eligible for free/reduced-price lunch                                
0–20 percent 2,526   346 14   301 12   794 31   997 39  
21–50 percent 4,266   1,108 26   410 10   1,185 28   1,507 35  
More than 50 percent 5,178   440 9   1,155 22   2,240 43   1,329 26  
                                 
Percent of students below 15th percentile on standardized tests                                
0–5 percent 2,169   886 41   172 8   812 37   243 11  
6–15 percent 5,018   488 10   451 9   1,595 32   2,383 47  
More than 15 percent 4,784   520 11   1,244 26   1,813 38   1,206 25   # #
                                 
Percent of students likely to attend college                                
0–35 percent 3,643   426 12   1,028 28   1,748 48   441 12   # #
36–60 percent 6,209   1,098 18   458 7   1,469 24   3,026 49   158 3
More than 60 percent 2,119   370 17   381 18   1,002 47   366 17   # #
                                 
Percent of students who consider academic achievement important                                
0–25 percent 787   104 13   401 51   86 11   195 25   # #
26–50 percent 3,229   962 30   341 11   1,398 43   440 14  
51–75 percent 3,917   409 10   596 15   1,113 28   1,786 46  
More than 75 percent 4,038   419 10   529 13   1,623 40   1,411 35  
                                 
Percent male enrollment                                
0–44 percent 808   235 29   165 20   321 40     # #
45–55 percent 10,623   1,650 16   1,556 15   3,626 34   3,633 34   158 1
More than 55 percent 540     146 27   273 50     # #
                                 
Student/teacher ratio2,3                                
Less than 12 3,348   246 7   427 13   1,309 39   1,310 39  
12–16 4,069   477 12   367 9   1,569 39   1,554 38  
More than 16 4,182   1,132 27   1,020 24   1,261 30   769 18   # #
                                 
Number of classroom changes2                                
0–3 changes 2,455   807 33     252 10   1,386 56   # #
4–6 changes 5,138   477 9   1,003 20   2,570 50   1,075 21  
More than 6 changes 3,579   478 13   794 22   1,130 32   1,069 30  
                                 
Use of paid law enforcement4                                
Regular use 7,763   1,153 15   1,700 22   2,660 34   2,093 27   158 2
No regular use 4,208   741 18   167 4   1,560 37   1,740 41   # #
                                 
Number of serious discipline problems5                                
No problems 3,806   933 25   192 5   1,610 42   982 26  
1 problem 3,171   264 8   298 9   785 25   1,788 56  
2 problems 1,063   181 17   236 22   371 35   256 24  
3 or more problems 3,931   516 13   1,141 29   1,453 37   807 21  
                                 
Transfers as percentage of enrollment2,6                                
0 to 6 percent 2,010   233 12   524 26   579 29   673 33   # #
6 to 11 percent 2,772   242 9   177 6   1,299 47   1,033 37  
11 to 21 percent 2,013   221 11   391 19   1,076 53   289 14  
21 percent or more 4,842   1,187 25   737 15   1,202 25   1,702 35  
                                 
Prevalence of schoolwide disruptions2,7                                
No disruptions 8,075   718 9   1,013 13   3,132 39   3,179 39  
Any disruptions 2,487   466 19   570 23   817 33   598 24  
                                 
Percent of students absent without excuses                                
None 946     103 11   119 13   605 64  
1–2 percent 4,078   324 8   382 9   1,096 27   2,276 56   # #
3–5 percent 3,251   914 28   395 12   1,514 47   378 12  
6–10 percent 2,041   251 12   483 24   907 44   401 20   # #
More than 10 percent 1,655   394 24   504 30   584 35     # #
                                 
Prevalence of violent incidents2,8                                
No violent incidents 1,260   # #     471 37   732 58   # #
Any violent incidents 10,687   1,882 18   1,811 17   3,736 35   3,100 29   158 1
# Rounds to zero.
‡ Reporting standards not met.
1 Specialized school was defined for respondents as, "a school that is specifically for students who were referred for disciplinary reasons. The school may also have students who were referred for other reasons. The school may be at the same location as your school."
2 Some schools are omitted from these categories because of missing data on their school characteristics. For this reason, the detailed results do not sum to the totals. See appendix J of 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) Detailed Data Documentation (NCES 2004-307) for further information.
3 Student/teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time equivalent teachers. The total number of full-time equivalent teachers is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers, including special education teachers, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
4 Schools were included as regularly using paid law enforcement if they reported the use of paid law enforcement during any of the following times: at any time during school hours, while students were arriving or leaving, at selected school activities (e.g., athletic and social events, open houses, science fairs), or at any other time that the respondent specified.
5 Serious discipline problems is a count of discipline problems reported by principals. These discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, and student acts of disrespect for teachers. If a principal reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems. Undesirable gang activities and undesirable cult or extremist group activities were also counted once as a problem if the principal reported that these events occurred at all in their school.
6 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school, divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
7 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as bomb threats or anthrax threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
8 Violent incidents include rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with or without a weapon, threat of physical attack with or without a weapon, and robbery with or without a weapon.
NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. "At school/at your school" was defined for respondents as including activities happening in school buildings, on school grounds, on school buses, and at places that are holding school-sponsored events or activities. Respondents were instructed to, unless the survey specified otherwise, only respond for those times that were during normal school hours or when school activities/events were in session. "Weapon" was defined for respondents as, "any instrument or object used with the intent to threaten, injure, or kill. Includes look-alikes if they are used to threaten others." "Firearm/explosive device" was defined for respondents as, "any weapon that is designed to (or may readily be converted to) expel a projectile by the action of an explosive. This includes guns, bombs, grenades, mines, rockets, missiles, pipe bombs, or similar devices designed to explode and capable of causing bodily harm or property damage." A gang was defined for respondents as, "an ongoing loosely organized association of three or more persons, whether formal or informal, that has a common name, signs, symbols or colors, whose members engage, either individually or collectively, in violent or other forms of illegal behavior." Elementary schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not higher than grade 3 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 8. Middle schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 4 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 9. Secondary schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 9 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 12. Combined schools include all other combinations of grades, including K–12 schools.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2000.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education