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Table 8.  Number and percentage of public schools reporting violent and other incidents of hate crimes with the number of incidents reported, by selected school characteristics: 1999–2000


School characteristic Violent incidents1   Serious violent incidents2   Theft3   Other incidents4
Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
  Num-
ber of schools
Per-
cent of schools
Num-
ber of incidents
All public schools 2,536 3 14,027   339 # 439   157 # 355   2,109 3 4,765
                               
Level                              
Elementary 806 2 8,239     # # #   1,081 2 2,146
Middle 918 6 3,447   82 1 105     542 4 1,766
Secondary 723 6 2,095   148 1 226   125 1 208   372 3 621
Combined 89 2 246   # # #     113 2 231
                               
Enrollment size                              
Less than 300 96 # 349   # # #     430 2 518
300–499 561 2 1,495   174 1 197   # # #   537 2 1,222
500–999 1,227 4 9,501   56 # 56   76 # 238   849 3 2,248
1,000 or more 651 7 2,683   108 1 186   47 1 82   293 3 777
                               
Urbanicity                              
City 863 4 3,457   49 # 119   79 # 179   714 4 2,160
Urban fringe 784 3 5,762   113 # 136   # # #   763 3 1,346
Town 438 4 896   151 1 151   44 # 141   236 2 324
Rural 451 2 3,912       396 2 935
                               
Crime level where students live5                              
High 306 6 4,040   # # #   # # #   220 4 969
Moderate 573 4 2,669   68 # 89     583 4 1,391
Low 1,350 2 5,857   193 # 216   107 # 221   1,147 2 2,147
Mixed 307 4 1,462   77 1 135     159 2 258
                               
Percent minority enrollment5                              
0–5 percent 773 3 4,528   157 1 188     391 2 840
6–20 percent 554 3 1,775   25 # 25   65 # 81   250 1 708
21–50 percent 571 3 5,173   62 # 82   # # #   657 4 1,415
More than 50 percent 602 3 2,461   95 # 145   63 # 146   793 4 1,746
                               
Percent of students eligible for free/reduced- price lunch                              
0–20 percent 770 3 1,939   170 1 190     500 2 1,061
21–50 percent 1,008 3 5,471   115 # 147   44 # 60   705 2 1,298
More than 50 percent 759 3 6,618   54 # 103   85 # 169   904 3 2,406
                               
Percent of students below 15th percentile on standardized tests                              
0–5 percent 482 2 1,710   42 # 65   63 # 161   536 2 817
6–15 percent 1,089 3 4,899   192 1 249   49 # 84   661 2 1,960
More than 15 percent 966 4 7,418   105 # 125     911 4 1,988
                               
Percent of students likely to attend college                              
0–35 percent 662 3 6,508   63 # 108     709 3 2,477
36–60 percent 948 3 5,042   151 1 171     912 3 1,307
More than 60 percent 926 3 2,477   125 # 160   56 # 153   488 2 982
                               
Percent of students who consider academic achievement important                              
0–25 percent 188 3 1,201   # # #   # # #   144 2 671
26–50 percent 597 3 5,373       494 3 1,076
51–75 percent 1,006 4 2,711   230 1 273   76 # 157   907 3 1,960
More than 75 percent 745 2 4,743   67 # 87   63 # 161   564 2 1,057
                               
Percent male enrollment                              
0–44 percent 451 5 8,266   39 # 39   # # #   367 4 498
45–55 percent 1,847 3 4,648   281 # 345   90 # 188   1,407 2 3,599
More than 55 percent 238 2 1,114     67 1 167   335 3 668
                               
Student/teacher ratio5,6                              
Less than 12 608 2 1,891   109 # 132     497 2 942
12–16 993 4 2,924   129 # 149   56 # 153   841 3 1,234
More than 16 831 4 8,689   82 # 102     752 3 2,571
                               
Number of classroom changes5                              
0–3 changes 252 1 1,056     # # #   450 2 588
4–6 changes 1,159 3 9,281   213 1 279   90 # 173   1,083 3 2,901
More than 6 changes 987 5 3,077   96 # 131   67 # 181   504 2 1,159
                               
Use of paid law enforcement7                              
Regular use 1,938 5 10,348   230 1 331   123 # 320   1,377 3 4,010
No regular use 598 2 3,680       732 2 755
                               
Number of serious discipline problems8                              
No problems 578 1 1,140   155 # 155     744 2 1,360
1 problem 333 2 973   80 1 138   85 1 169   340 2 607
2 problems 409 5 1,314   58 1 93     330 4 428
3 or more problems 1,216 11 10,601   45 # 53     694 6 2,370
                               
Transfers as percentage of enrollment5,9                              
0 to 6 percent 620 3 1,812     60 # 60   312 2 612
6 to 11 percent 616 3 4,367   87 # 109   46 # 161   402 2 973
11 to 21 percent 583 3 2,186   63 # 63   # # #   731 4 1,349
21 percent or more 633 3 5,292   54 # 86     485 2 957
                               
Prevalence of schoolwide disruptions5,10                              
No disruptions 1,676 2 10,919   218 # 264   125 # 258   1,592 2 3,345
Any disruptions 758 9 2,601   120 1 176     150 2 214
                               
Percent of students absent without excuses                              
None 84 1 417     # # #   350 2 597
1–2 percent 988 3 2,714   180 1 180     835 3 2,153
3–5 percent 745 4 4,720   81 # 112   79 # 194   379 2 993
6–10 percent 445 5 1,432   30 # 50     244 3 650
More than 10 percent 274 7 4,744   39 1 89     301 8 372
# Rounds to zero.
‡ Reporting standards not met.
1 Violent incidents include rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with or without a weapon, threat of physical attack with or without a weapon, and robbery with or without a weapon.
2 Serious violent incidents include rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with a weapon, threat of physical attack with a weapon, and robbery with or without a weapon.
3 Theft/larceny (taking things over $10 without personal confrontation) was defined for respondents as, "the unlawful taking of another person's property without personal confrontation, threat, violence, or bodily harm. Included are pocket picking, stealing purse or backpack (if left unattended or no force was used to take it from owner), theft from a building, theft from a motor vehicle or motor vehicle parts or accessories, theft of bicycles, theft from vending machines, and all other types of thefts."
4 Other incidents include possession of a firearm or explosive device, possession of a knife or sharp object, distribution of illegal drugs, possession or use of alcohol or illegal drugs, sexual harassment, or vandalism.
5 Some schools are omitted from these categories because of missing data on their school characteristics. For this reason, the detailed results do not sum to the totals. See appendix J of 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) Detailed Data Documentation (NCES 2004-307) for further information.
6 Student/teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time equivalent teachers. The total number of full-time equivalent teachers is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers, including special education teachers, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
7 Schools were included as regularly using paid law enforcement if they reported the use of paid law enforcement during any of the following times: at any time during school hours, while students were arriving or leaving, at selected school activities (e.g., athletic and social events, open houses, science fairs), or at any other time that the respondent specified.
8 Serious discipline problems is a count of discipline problems reported by principals. These discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, and student acts of disrespect for teachers. If a principal reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems. Undesirable gang activities and undesirable cult or extremist group activities were also counted once as a problem if the principal reported that these events occurred at all in their school.
9 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school, divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
10 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as bomb threats or anthrax threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. "At school/at your school" was defined for respondents as including activities happening in school buildings, on school grounds, on school buses, and at places that are holding school-sponsored events or activities. Respondents were instructed to, unless the survey specified otherwise, only respond for those times that were during normal school hours or when school activities/events were in session. A hate crime was defined for respondents as, "a criminal offense or threat against a person, property, or society that is motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender's bias against a race, color, national origin, ethnicity, gender, religion, disability, or sexual orientation." Elementary schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not higher than grade 3 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 8. Middle schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 4 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 9. Secondary schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 9 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 12. Combined schools include all other combinations of grades, including K–12 schools.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2000.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education