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E.D. TAB: Public School Principal Survey on Safe, Disciplined, and Drug Free Schools
NCES: 92007
February 1992

Highlights

Public School Principal Survey on Safe, Disciplined, and Drug-Free Schools

  • Student alcohol use was considered a serious or moderate problem by 11 percent of all public school principals (Table 2). Thirty-three percent of secondary school principals and 2 percent of elementary school principals thought student alcohol use was a serious or moderate problem in their school.
     
  • Student drug use was considered a serious or moderate problem by 6 percent of all public school principals (Table 2). Sixteen percent of secondary school principals and 1 percent of elementary school principals thought student drug use was a serious or moderate problem in their school.
     
  • For every 100 students, public school principals reported an average of about 6 in-school suspensions due to disruptive behavior or student alcohol and drug use, possession, or sales during the fall 1990 semester (Table 3). Principals also reported that, for every 100 students, there were about 4 out-of-school suspensions, but less than 1 expulsion, transfer to an alternative school, or police notification.
     
  • Over 90 percent of public schools-both elementary and secondary schools-offer referrals to social services outside the school system for disruptive students (Table 5). About 70 percent of public schools offer such outside referrals for students using alcohol, drugs, or tobacco (Table 6).
     
  • Thirty-five percent of public school principals indicated that their ability to maintain order and discipline in their school was limited to a great or moderate extent by a lack of or inadequate alternative placements/programs for disruptive students (Table 8).
     
  • School alcohol prevention programs and policies were considered highly effective in reducing alcohol use by 11 percent of public school principals, moderately effective by 17 percent, not very effective by 5 percent, and not at all effective by 1 percent (Table 9). Alcohol use was considered not a problem in their school by the remaining 66 percent of principals.
     
  • General discipline programs and policies were considered highly effective in reducing disruptive behavior by 33 percent of public school principals, moderately effective by 45 percent, not very effective by 4 percent, and not at all effective by 1 percent (Table 9). Disruptive behavior was considered not a problem in their school by the remaining 17 percent of principals.
     
  • Public schools offer drug use education in many settings. Over 90 percent offer drug use education within the health curriculum; 86 percent at special assemblies or events; 74 percent within the science curriculum: 63 percent throughout the curriculum; and 37 percent as a separate course (Table 11).
     
  • The average number of hours drug use education was taught in each public school grade during the 1990-91 school year ranged from about 10 hours in kindergarten to about 26 hours in grade 7 and to about 15 hours in grade 12 (Table 12).
     
  • According to 69 percent of public school principals, police provided assistance or educational support to a great or moderate extent in promoting safe, disciplined, and drug-free schools (Table 15). About half of school principals indicated that social service agencies and parent groups provided the same level of support.
     

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