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NCES is making selected FRSS data sets available for download. Below is a list of data sets currently available (ordered by NCES number).

Downloading Data Instructions:

  • Flat files are ASCII text files that contain no formatting and have no column headers; however, they are convenient to use with statistical processing programs.
  • SAS files are formatted for analysis in SAS data analysis software; the readme.txt file in the documentation for each survey describes the function of the various SAS files.
  • The general documentation file includes the record layout, the survey form, and a description of the methodology used in the survey.
  • For information on unzipping and downloading zip zip file icon files, visit our help section.
  • Data files from an ongoing series of surveys are indicated by an asterisk * following a file icon file icon*. Data files that contain data from both FRSS and PEQIS surveys are indicated by two asterisks ** following a file icon file icon**.
  • PDF files can be viewed through Adobe Acrobat Reader adobe acrobat image.
  • NOTE: Due to our confidentiality legislation, however, you will need to obtain (or amend) an NCES restricted data license if you want to access all raw data from some surveys.

file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 105): Condition of Public School Facilities: 2012-13

This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled "Condition of Public School Facilities: 2012-13." This survey was designed to provide national estimates on the condition of public school facilities in the 2012-13 school year. NCES released the results of this survey in the First Look report “Condition of America’s Public School Facilities: 2012-13” (NCES 2014-022).

Questionnaires and cover letters were mailed in January 2013. While individual schools were sampled, the questionnaires were mailed to the districts with which the schools were associated. A separate questionnaire was enclosed for each sampled school. The cover letter indicated that the survey was designed to be completed by district-level personnel who were very familiar with the school facilities in the district. Often this was a district facilities coordinator (although the title of the position varied). The letter indicated that the respondent might want to consult with other district-level personnel or with school-level personnel, such as the principal of the sampled school, in answering some of the questions. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the Web. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in February 2013 and completed in June 2013. The weighted response rate was 90 percent.

Respondents reported on the condition of 17 building systems/features and seven outdoor features. Data on the estimated total cost of all repairs/renovations/modernizations required to put the school’s onsite buildings in good overall condition were also collected. Other survey topics included the year in which the school’s main instructional building was constructed, and whether any major repair/renovation/modernization work was currently being performed. Respondents also reported whether various steps had been taken in the last 5 years to improve energy efficiency at the school.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 104): Dual Credit and Exam-Based Courses, 2010-11

This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled "Dual Credit and Exam-Based Courses." This survey provides national estimates on the prevalence and characteristics of dual credit and exam-based courses in public high schools. For this survey, dual credit is defined as a course or program where high school students can earn both high school and postsecondary credits for the same courses; exam-based courses are Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses. NCES released the results of this survey in the First Look report “Dual Credit and Exam-Based Courses in U.S. Public High Schools: 2010–11” (NCES 2013-001).

Questionnaires and cover letters were mailed to the principal of each sampled school in September 2011. The letter stated the purpose of the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the person most knowledgeable about dual credit and exam-based courses in the school, often the school’s lead guidance counselor or director of school guidance counselors. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the Web. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in October 2011 and completed in February 2012. The weighted response rate was 91 percent.

The survey asked respondents to report information on courses for which they could earn dual credit with any postsecondary institution. Respondents reported on requirements that students must meet in order to enroll in dual credit courses. Data on whether students took any courses with an academic focus or with a career and technical/vocational focus were also collected. Other survey topics included whether courses were taught through distance education or at various locations, and whether the courses were taught by high school or postsecondary instructors. Respondents also reported whether most students (and their parents), the school, or district paid for various dual credit course expenses.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 103): Arts Education Surveys of Secondary School Teachers

This file contains data from two fast-response surveys, titled “Survey of Secondary School Music Specialists,” and “Survey of Secondary School Visual Arts Specialists.” These surveys provide national estimates on arts education and arts instructors in public secondary schools during the 2009–10 school year. These two surveys are part of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to these secondary teacher surveys, the set includes a survey of elementary school principals, a survey of secondary school principals, and three elementary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report “A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10 (NCES 2011-078). A second report, released in April 2012, presents findings on a broader set of indicators.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the surveys were mailed to each sampled secondary school teacher in batches from January through April 2010. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the sampled teacher. Respondents were offered the option of responding to the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from February through July 2010. The weighted response rates were 81.8 percent for the music specialist survey and 85.3 percent for the visual arts specialist survey.

This study of arts education in public schools is the third of its kind conducted by NCES. Previous studies were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years. This is the first time that surveys of secondary school teachers have been included in the study. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The secondary teacher surveys collected data on the teaching load of music and visual arts specialists in secondary schools; teacher participation in various professional development activities and the perceived impact of such participation on teaching; and teachers’ use of formal methods of assessment of students’ progress and achievement in the arts.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 102): Arts Education Surveys of Elementary School Teachers

This file contains data from three fast-response surveys, titled "Survey of Elementary School Music Specialists," "Survey of Elementary School Visual Arts Specialists," and "Arts Survey of Elementary School Classroom Teachers." These surveys provide national estimates on arts education and arts instructors in public elementary schools during the 2009–10 school year. These three surveys are part of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to these elementary teacher surveys, the set includes a survey of elementary school principals, a survey of secondary school principals, and two secondary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report "A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10 (NCES 2011-078). A second report, released in April 2012, presents findings on a broader set of indicators.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the surveys were mailed to sampled elementary school teachers in batches from January through April 2010. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the sampled teacher. Respondents were offered the option of responding to the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from February through August 2010. The weighted response rates were 86.5 percent for the music specialist survey, 87.6 percent for the visual arts specialist survey, and 81.5 percent for the classroom teacher survey.

Previous studies of arts education were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years, with surveys of elementary school teachers first included in the 1999–2000 study. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The elementary teacher surveys collected data on the teaching load of music and visual arts specialists in elementary schools; teacher participation in various professional development activities; the ways in which self-contained classroom teachers teach arts education as part of their instructional program; and teachers’ use of formal methods of assessment of students’ achievement in the arts.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 101): Secondary School Arts Education Survey

This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled "Secondary School Arts Education Survey: Fall 2009." This survey provides national estimates on student access to arts education and the resources available for such instruction in public secondary schools during fall 2009. This is one of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to this survey, the set includes a survey of elementary school principals, three elementary teacher-level surveys, and two secondary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report “A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10” (NCES 2011-078). A second report, planned for early 2012, will present findings on a broader set of indicators. NCES is releasing separate data files for each of the seven surveys.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled secondary school in September 2009. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the school principal. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from October 2009 through June 2010. The weighted response rate was 89 percent.

This study is the third of its kind to be conducted by NCES. Previous studies were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The secondary school survey collected data on the availability of music, visual arts, dance, and drama/theatre instruction; enrollment in these courses, the type of space used for arts instruction, the availability of curriculum guides for arts teachers to follow, and the number of arts teachers who are specialists in the subject. Principals reported on graduation requirements for coursework in the arts; school or district provision of teacher professional development in the arts; and arts education programs, activities, and events. Principals also reported on community partnerships and support from outside sources for arts education.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 100): Elementary School Arts Education Survey: Fall 2009

This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled “Elementary School Arts Education Survey: Fall 2009.” This survey provides national estimates on student access to arts education and resources available for such instruction in public elementary schools during fall 2009. This is one of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to this survey, the set includes a survey of secondary school principals, three elementary teacher-level surveys, and two secondary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report “A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10 (NCES 2011-078). A second report, released in April 2012, presents findings on a broader set of indicators. NCES is releasing separate data files for each of the seven surveys.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled elementary school in September 2009. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the school principal. Respondents were offered the option of responding to the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from October 2009 through June 2010. The weighted response rate was 85 percent.

This study of arts education in public schools is the third of its kind to be conducted by NCES. Previous studies were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The elementary school survey collected data on the availability and characteristics of music, visual arts, dance, and drama/theatre instruction; the type of space used for arts instruction; the availability of curriculum guides for arts teachers to follow; and whether those teaching the subject are arts specialists. Principals also reported on school or district provision of teacher professional development in the arts; arts education programs, activities, and events; and school-community partnerships.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 99): Dropout Prevention Services and Programs Survey

This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled "Dropout Prevention Services and Programs." This survey provides national estimates on how public school districts identify students at risk of dropping out, programs used specifically to address the needs of students at risk of dropping out of school, the use of mentors for at-risk students, and efforts to encourage dropouts to return to school. NCES released the results of this survey in the First Look report “Dropout Prevention Services and Programs in Public School Districts: 2010–11” (NCES 2011-037).

Questionnaires and cover letters were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled school district in September 2010. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the person most knowledgeable about dropout prevention services and programs in the district. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the Web. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in October 2010 and completed in January 2011. The weighted response rate was 89 percent.

The survey asked respondents to report information on various services or programs offered by districts specifically to address the needs of students at risk of dropping out of school. Respondents reported on the types of transition support services used to help all students transition from a school at one instructional level to a school at a higher instructional level. Data on the various factors used to identify students who were at risk of dropping out were also collected. Other survey topics included whether the district tried to determine the status of students who were expected to return to school in the fall but who do not return as expected, and whether the district follows up before the next school year with students who drop out to encourage them to return to school. Respondents also reported whether the district used various types of information to determine whether to implement additional district-wide dropout prevention efforts.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 98): Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2009–10

This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled "Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary Students: 2009-10." This survey provides national estimates on distance education courses in public school districts, including enrollment in distance education courses, how districts monitor these courses, the motivations for providing distance education, and the technologies used for delivering distance education. NCES released the results of this survey in the First Look report “Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2009–10” (NCES 2012-008).

Questionnaires and cover letters were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled school district in November 2010. The letter stated the purpose of the study and asked that the definition of distance education be reviewed to determine who in the district would be best suited to provide the requested information. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in late November 2010 and completed in March 2011. The weighted response rate was 95 percent.

The survey asked respondents to report information on the number of distance education enrollments in their district. Respondents reported on whether the district tracked distance education course completions and if students enrolled in regular high school programs could take a full course load using only distance education courses. Data on the entities that developed and delivered distance education courses were also collected. Other survey topics included the types of distance education courses taken by students, whether the district plans to expand the number of distance education courses, and the technologies used for delivering distance education.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 96): Alternative Schools and Programs for Public School Students at Risk of Educational Failure, 2007-08

Web Release: March 29, 2010

Abstract: This file contains data from an initial 2008 fast-response survey titled "District Survey of Alternative Schools and Programs: 2007-08" and a short follow-up survey. Together, these surveys provide national estimates on the availability of alternative schools and programs for students at risk of educational failure in public school districts during the 2007–08 school year. The initial survey asked about alternative schools and programs administered by the district. The follow-up survey expanded the coverage by asking about students enrolled in the district who attended alternative schools and programs administered by an entity other than the district. NCES released the results of the initial and follow-up surveys in the First Look report Alternative Schools and Programs for Public School Students At Risk of Educational Failure: 2007–08.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the initial study were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled school district in August 2008. The weighted response rate was 96 percent. Questionnaires and cover letters for the follow-up study were mailed in April 2009 to all respondents who completed the initial 2007–08 survey. Completed questionnaires were received from 99 percent of districts that responded to the initial 2007–08 survey.

The initial survey asked respondents to report on the availability and number of district-administered alternative schools and programs. The initial survey also asked about enrollment in district-administered alternative schools and programs, entry and exit procedures, and curriculum and services offered. The follow-up survey asked whether any students enrolled in the district attended an alternative school or program administered by an entity other than the district. The follow-up survey also requested the number of students enrolled in the district who attended alternative schools and programs administered by an entity other than the district and the type of entity that administered the alternative school or program. For both the initial and follow-up surveys, alternative schools and programs were defined as those that are designed to address the needs of students that typically cannot be met in regular schools. The students who attend alternative schools and programs are typically at risk of educational failure (as indicated by poor grades, truancy, disruptive behavior, pregnancy, or similar factors associated with temporary or permanent withdrawal from school).

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 95): Teachers' Use of Educational Technology in U.S. Public Schools, 2009

Web Release: May 6, 2010

Abstract: This file contains data from a 2009 fast-response survey titled "Teachers' Use of Educational Technology in U.S. Public Schools." This survey provides national estimates on the availability and use of educational technology among teachers in public elementary and secondary schools during 2009. This is one of a set of three surveys (at the district, school, and teacher levels) that collected data on a range of educational technology resources. NCES released the results of this teacher-level survey in the First Look report Teachers’ Use of Educational Technology in U.S. Public Schools: 2009 (NCES 2010-040).

Data collection for the study was conducted in two stages. The first stage was the collection of teacher sampling lists, which coincided with data collection for the school survey. Materials were mailed to the principal of each sampled school in September 2008. The materials introduced the study and requested that a list of eligible teachers be provided by mail or fax. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and clarification of information on the lists was initiated in early October 2008 and completed in April 2009. The weighted list collection response rate was 81 percent. For the second stage of collection, questionnaires and cover letters for the teacher survey were mailed to sampled teachers at their schools. Sampling and mailing was conducted in batches, as teacher lists were collected and processed, beginning in January 2009 and ending in April 2009.

Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in early February 2009 and completed in July 2009. The weighted teacher response rate was 79 percent.

The survey asked respondents to report information on the use of computers and Internet access in the classroom; availability and use of computing devices, software, and school or district networks (including remote access) by teachers; students’ use of educational technology; teachers’ preparation to use educational technology for instruction; and technology-related professional development activities. Respondents reported quantities for the following: computers located in the classroom every day, computers that can be brought into the classroom, and computers with Internet access. Data on the availability and frequency of using computers and other technology devices during instructional time were also collected. Respondents reported on students’ use of educational technology resources during classes and teachers’ use of modes of technology to communicate with parents and students. Additional survey topics included teacher training and preparation to effectively use educational technology for instruction, and teachers’ opinions related to statements about their participation in professional development for educational technology.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 93): Educational Technology in Public School Districts, Fall 2008

Web Release: March 29, 2010

Abstract: This file contains data from a 2008 fast-response survey titled "Educational Technology in Public School Districts." This survey provides national estimates on the availability and use of educational technology in public school districts during fall 2008. This is one of a set of three surveys (at the district, school, and teacher levels) that collected data on a range of educational technology resources. NCES released the results of this district-level survey in the First Look report Educational Technology in Public School Districts: Fall 2008 (NCES 2010-003).

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled school district in early August 2008. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the person most knowledgeable about educational technology in the district. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in late August 2008 and completed in January 2009. The weighted response rate was 90 percent.

The survey asked respondents to report information on networks and Internet capacity, technology policies, district-provided resources, teacher professional development, and district-level leadership for technology. Respondents reported the number of schools in the district with a local area network and the number of schools with each type of district network connection. Data on the types of connections from districts to the Internet were also collected. The survey collected information on written district policies on acceptable student use of various technologies. Other survey topics included employment of staff responsible for educational technology leadership and the type of teacher professional development offered or required by districts for educational technology. Respondents gave their opinions on statements related to the use of educational technology in the instructional programs in their districts.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 92): Educational Technology in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2008

Web Release: May 6, 2010

Abstract: This file contains data from a 2008 fast-response survey titled “Educational Technology in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2008.” This survey provides national estimates on the availability and use of educational technology in public elementary and secondary schools during fall 2008. This is one of a set of three surveys (at the district, school, and teacher levels) that collected data on a range of educational technology resources. NCES released the results of this school-level survey in the First Look report Educational Technology in U.S. Public Schools: Fall 2008 (NCES 2010-034).

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled school in September 2008. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the person most knowledgeable about educational technology within the school. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in early October 2008 and completed in July 2009. The weighted response rate was 79 percent.

The survey asked respondents to report information on computer hardware and Internet access, availability of staff to help integrate technology into instruction and provide timely technical support, and perceptions of educational technology issues at the school and district levels. Respondents reported the number of instructional computers within their schools, by type, mobility, and location. The survey also asked respondents about the types of operating systems or platforms used on instructional computers. Data on the number of handheld devices provided to school personnel and students, and the number of other technology devices provided for instructional purposes were also collected. Respondents indicated the extent to which technology staff provided assistance with technology support and integration and the response times for obtaining such support. Respondents gave opinions on statements related to using educational technology in their schools.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 91): After-School Programs in Public Elementary Schools

Web Release: August 4, 2009

Abstract: This file contains data from a 2008 fast-response survey titled “After-School Programs in Public Elementary Schools.” This survey provides a national profile of various types of formal after-school programs physically located at public elementary schools in 2008. These programs include stand-alone programs that focus primarily on a single type of service (e.g., only day care) and broad-based programs that provide a combination of services such as academic enrichment and cultural activities. NCES released the results of the survey in the First Look report After-School Programs in Public Elementary Schools.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled school in late December 2007. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the person most knowledgeable about after-school programs that were physically located at the school. Respondents were encouraged to consult with the administrators of after-school programs that were located at the school but operated by some entity other than the school or district (e.g., privately run fee-based day care). Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the Web or by mail. Telephone followup for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in January 2008 and completed in early May 2008. The final response rate was 91 percent.

The survey focuses on four broad types of after-school programs: (1) fee-based stand-alone day care programs for which parents paid fees; (2) stand-alone academic instruction/tutoring programs that focus exclusively on academic instruction or tutoring, including Supplemental Educational Services in schools that did not meet Adequate Yearly Progress; (3) the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLCs) administered through the federally funded 21st CCLC Program to provide academic enrichment opportunities; and (4) other types of formal stand-alone or broad-based after-school programs. The information collected about after-school programs includes: program focus (if applicable), number of students enrolled, hours per week the program operates, availability of transportation for students, whether students from other schools attend the program, and factors that may hinder students from participating in the program.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 90): Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2005 (NCES 2007-062)

Web Release: April 4, 2007

Abstract: This file contains data from a fall 2005 fast-response survey titled "Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2005." This study was the most recent in a series of fast-response surveys that have tracked access to information technology in schools and classrooms since 1994. These surveys provide trend analysis on the percent of public schools and instructional rooms with Internet access and on the ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access. NCES released the results of the 2005 survey in the publication "Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2005." Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled school in early October 2005, requesting that the questionnaire be completed by the technology coordinator or person most knowledgeable about Internet access at the school. Respondents were also offered the option of completing the survey via the Web. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in November 2005 and completed in March 2006. The final response rate was 86 percent. Respondents were asked about the number of instructional computers with access to the Internet, the types of Internet connections, technologies and procedures used to prevent student access to inappropriate material on the Internet, and the availability of hand-held and laptop computers for students and teachers. Respondents also provided information on teacher professional development on how to integrate the use of the Internet into the curriculum, and on the use of the Internet to provide opportunities and information for teaching and learning.

Reports released using this data:

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 89): Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students, 2004-05

Web Release: June 29, 2010

Abstract: This file contains data from a 2004-05 fast-response survey titled "Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students, 2004-05." This survey provides national estimates for technology-based distance education courses in public elementary and secondary schools. NCES released the results of this district-level survey in the Statistical Analysis Report "Technology-Based Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002-03 and 2004-05" (NCES 2008-008).

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled district in November 2005. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the district’s director of curriculum and instruction, the technology coordinator, the distance education coordinator, or another staff member who was most knowledgeable about the district’s distance education courses. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse was completed at the end of May 2006. Telephone follow-up for quality control and data clarification was completed in November 2006. The weighted response rate was 96 percent.

For this survey, distance education courses were defined as credit-granting courses offered via audio, video, or Internet or other computer technologies to elementary and secondary school students enrolled in the district, in which the teacher and students were in different locations. The survey collected information on the percent of districts and the percent of schools (by instructional level) with students enrolled in technology-based distance education courses. The number of enrollments in distance education courses (by instructional level) was also collected. The survey contained questions on the completion status of the enrollments in distance education. Districts were asked to report the technologies used to deliver distance education courses and where students accessed online distance education courses (e.g., at school or at home). The survey included questions on whether technology-based distance education was used to offer Advanced Placement (AP) and college-level courses to students. Districts with students enrolled in technology-based distance education courses were asked whether they planned to expand their distance education courses.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 88): Public School Principals' Perceptions of Their School Facilities: Fall 2005 (NCES 2008-011)

Web Release: March 26, 2008

Abstract: This file contains data from a 2005 fast-response survey titled "Public School Principals' Perceptions of Their School Facilities: Fall 2005." The study provides information about principals' satisfaction with various environmental factors in their schools, and the extent to which they perceive those factors as interfering with the ability of the school to deliver instruction. Environmental factors included lighting, temperature control, air quality, and structural conditions. The study also provides information on the extent of the match between the enrollment and the capacity of the school buildings. NCES released the results of the survey in the publication Public School Principals Report on Their School Facilities: Fall 2005.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled school in mid-September 2005. The letter introduced the study, and requested that the questionnaire be completed only by the principal of the school listed on the label. Respondents were also offered the option of completing the survey via the Web. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in early October and completed in late January 2006. The final response rate was 90 percent.

Principals were asked about their satisfaction with various environmental factors in classrooms located in permanent buildings and in portable (temporary) buildings (if applicable) in their school, and the extent to which they perceived those environmental factors as interfering with the ability of the school to deliver instruction in those classrooms. They were also asked about the ways in which their school used portable (temporary) buildings and the reasons for using them, and the availability of dedicated room or facilities for particular subjects (science labs, art rooms, music rooms, and gymnasium) and the extent to which these facilities were perceived to support instruction. Principals were also asked about the enrollment and design capacity of their schools, and approaches for coping with overcrowding (if applicable).

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 87): Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools, 2005 (NCES 2006-106)

Web Release: January 4, 2007

Abstract: This file contains data from a 2005 fast-response survey titled "Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005." The study was prompted by concern over the rate of obesity among school-age children and was designed to obtain current national information on availability of foods and opportunities for exercise in public elementary schools. NCES released the results of the survey in the publication Calories In, Calories Out: Food and Exercise in Public Elementary Schools, 2005.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled school in early March 2005, requesting that the questionnaire be completed by the person most knowledgeable about the availability of foods and opportunities for physical activity at the school. Respondents were encouraged to consult with the school's food service personnel and physical education staff to complete relevant sections of the questionnaire. Respondents were also offered the option of completing the survey via the Web. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in late March 2005 and completed in late June 2005. The final response rate was 91 percent.

Respondents were asked about the types of food sold at one or more locations in their schools and in their cafeterias or lunchrooms; the types of food sold at vending machines and school stores or snack bars, and times when foods were available at those locations; food service operations and contracts with companies to sell foods at schools; scheduled recess, including the days per week, times per day, and minutes per day of recess; scheduled physical education, including the days per week, class length, and average minutes per week of physical education; activities to encourage physical activity among elementary students; and the physical assessment of students.

Reports Released using this data:

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 86): Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2003 (NCES 2007-034)

Web Release: June 6, 2007

Abstract: This file contains data from a fall 2003 fast-response survey titled "Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2003." This study was included in a series of fast-response surveys that have tracked access to information technology in schools and classrooms since 1994. These surveys provide trend analysis on the percent of public schools and instructional rooms with Internet access and on the ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access. NCES released the results of the 2003 survey in the publication "Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2003." Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled school in early October 2003, requesting that the questionnaire be completed by the technology coordinator or person most knowledgeable about Internet access at the school. Respondents were also offered the option of completing the survey via the Web. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in October 2003 and completed in February 2004. The final response rate was 91 percent. Respondents were asked about the number of instructional computers with access to the Internet, the types of Internet connections, support of computer hardware/software, technologies and procedures used to prevent student access to inappropriate material on the Internet, and computer availability outside of regular school hours. Respondents also provided information on school websites, the availability of hand-held and laptop computers for students and teachers, and teacher professional development on how to integrate the use of the Internet into the curriculum.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 85): Dual Credit and Exam-Based Courses in U.S. Public High Schools: 2002-03 (NCES 2009-031)

Web Release: February 10, 2009

Abstract: This file contains data from a 2003 fast-response survey titled "Dual Credit and Exam-Based Courses." This survey provides baseline information regarding the prevalence and characteristics of dual credit courses. The survey also collected information on two types of exam-based courses, Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB). These types of courses provide high school students with another way of bridging K–12 and postsecondary education. NCES released the results of the survey in the publication Dual Credit and Exam-Based Courses in U.S. Public High Schools: 2002-03.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled school in mid-September 2003. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the school's director of guidance counseling or other staff member who is most knowledgeable about the school's dual credit, Advanced Placement, and International Baccalaureate courses. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the Web or by mail. Telephone followup for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in early October 2003 and completed in early January 2004. The final response rate was 92 percent.

The survey asked respondents to report on the prevalence and enrollment of dual credit and exam-based courses in their high schools. Additional information was obtained on dual credit courses, including the location and educational focus of these courses, dual credit course characteristics, and school requirements surrounding dual credit courses. For this study, dual credit was defined as a course or program where high school students can earn both high school and postsecondary credits for the same course. Dual credit courses could be located on a high school campus or the campus of a postsecondary institution, or taught through distance education. Additionally, the dual credit options must be either legislated by the state or have an articulated or other formal written agreement between the high school and the postsecondary institution. The survey also collected enrollment information for Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 84): Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002-03 (NCES 2007-028)

Web Release: April 4, 2007

Abstract: This file contains data from a fast-response survey conducted in winter-spring 2003-04 titled "Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002-03." This public school district survey was the first nationally representative study to examine technology-based distance education availability, course offerings, and enrollments in the nation’s public elementary and secondary schools. For this study, distance education courses were defined as credit-granting courses offered to elementary and secondary school students enrolled in the district in which the teacher and students were in different locations. NCES released the results of the survey in the publication "Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002-03." Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled district in November 2003, requesting that the questionnaire be completed by the district’s director of curriculum and instruction, the technology coordinator, the distance education coordinator, or another staff member who was most knowledgeable about the district’s distance education courses. Respondents were also offered the option of completing the survey via the Web. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in December 2003 and completed in April 2004. The final response rate was 94 percent. The survey asked whether there were any public elementary or secondary school students in the district enrolled in distance education courses. If the respondents indicated that there were public elementary or secondary school students in the district enrolled in distance education courses, they were asked to report the number of schools in their district with students enrolled in distance education courses by instructional level of the school. Respondents were also asked to report the number of distance education course enrollments in schools in their district by instructional level of the school and curriculum area. Other survey items asked which technologies were used as primary modes of instructional delivery for distance education courses, which entities delivered distance education courses, whether any students accessed online distance education courses (and if so, from which locations), and the district’s reasons for having distance education courses. Finally, respondents were asked whether their district had any plans to expand their distance education courses, and if so, which factors, if any, might be keeping them from expanding those courses.

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file icon Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 83): Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2002 (NCES 2007-035)

Web Release: June 6, 2007

Abstract: This file contains data from a fall 2002 fast-response survey titled "Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2002." This study was included in a series of fast-response surveys that have tracked access to information technology in schools and classrooms since 1994. These surveys provide trend analysis on the percent of public schools and instructional rooms with Internet access and on the ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access. NCES released the results of the 2002 survey in the publication "Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2002." Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled school in early October 2002, requesting that the questionnaire be completed by the technology coordinator or person most knowledgeable about Internet access at the school. Respondents were also offered the option of completing the survey via the Web. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated later in October and completed in December. The final response rate was 92 percent. Respondents were asked about the number of instructional computers with access to the Internet, the types of Internet connections, support of computer hardware/software, technologies and procedures used to prevent student access to inappropriate material on the Internet, and computer availability outside of regular school hours. Respondents also provided information on school websites, the availability of hand-held and laptop computers for students and teachers, and teacher professional development on how to integrate the use of the Internet into the curriculum.

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file icon * Internet Access in Public Schools, Fall 2000 (FRSS 79): Public Use Data Files (NCES 2003-039)

Web Release: May 6, 2003

Abstract: This file contains data from a 2000 quick-response survey, "Survey on Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 2000" (FRSS 79). The survey was completed by school officials at elementary and secondary public schools. These officials were asked about Internet access and other information technology resources at their schools. Questions covered availability of computers, school and classroom level Internet access, acceptable use policies, access to technology after school hours, whether or not particular groups within the school (i.e., administrative staff, teachers, students, students with disabilities) were able to access the Internet, number of computers on site, speed of Internet connection, sources of technology funding, school personnel for advanced telecommunications support, and availability of special software and hardware for students with disabilities.

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file icon District Survey of Alternative Schools and Programs (FRSS 76): Public Use Data Files (NCES 2003-053)

Web Release: May 6, 2003

Abstract: This file contains data from a 2001 quick-response survey, “District Survey of Alternative Schools and Programs” (FRSS 76). The survey was completed by district-level personnel most knowledgeable about alternative schools and programs. These officials were asked about availability of public alternative schools and programs, enrollment, staffing, and services for students at risk of educational failure. Questions covered location of programs, enrollment, procedures for handling exceeded capacity, exit and entry policies and procedures, staffing, curriculum and services offered, and district background information.

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file icon * Internet Access in Public Schools, Fall 1999 (FRSS 75): Public Use Data Files (NCES 2003-041)

Web Release: May 6, 2003

Abstract: This file contains data from a 1999 quick-response survey, "Survey on Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools, Fall 1999" (FRSS 75). The survey was completed by school officials at elementary and secondary public schools. These officials were asked about Internet access and other information technology resources at their schools. Questions covered availability of computers, school and classroom level Internet access, whether or not particular groups within the school (i.e., administrative staff, teachers, students, disabled students) were able to access the Internet, number of computers on site, speed of Internet connection, sources of technology funding, and school personnel for advanced telecommunications support.

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file icon Condition of Public School Facilities, 1999 (FRSS 73): Public Use Data Files (NCES 2003-037)

Web Release: May 6, 2003

Abstract: This file contains data from a 1999 school survey, Condition of Public School Facilities (FRSS 73). Included in this data file is information on the pervasiveness of air conditioning, the number of temporary classrooms, the number of days particular public schools were closed for repairs, planned construction, repairs, and additions, long range facilities plans, the age of public schools, overcrowding and practices used to address overcrowding, estimated costs for bringing facilities to a satisfactory condition, and the overall condition of roofs, floors, walls, plumbing, heating, electric facilities, and safety features.

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file icon ** Occupational Programs and the Use of Skill Competencies at the Secondary and Postsecondary Levels, 1999 (FRSS 72 and PEQIS 11): Public Use Data Files (NCES 2003-038)

Web Release: May 6, 2003

Abstract: This file contains data from two 1999 quick-response surveys: "Vocational Programs in Secondary Schools" (FRSS 72) and "Occupational Programs in Postsecondary Education Institutions" (PEQIS 11). The surveys were conducted in response to national concern over the gap between existing workforce skills and expanding workplace demands. These data files include information on vocational and occupational programs at the secondary and postsecondary level, including the availability of programs in a large variety of occupational areas, procedures used to ensure courses teach relevant job skills, the prevalence of skill competency lists, the level of industry/educator partnership in developing skill competency lists, and the types of credentials available through the programs.

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file icon National Student Service-Learning and Community Service Survey (FRSS 71): Public Use Data Files (NCES 2003-074)

Web Release: May 6, 2003

Abstract: This file contains data from a 1999 quick-response survey, "National Student Service-Learning and Community Service Survey" (FRSS 71). The survey was sent to principals at elementary and secondary public schools, who passed it along to the school official most knowledgeable about the types of programs in question. These officials were asked about policies, support, and funding for their school’s community service and service learning programs. Questions covered rates of student participation, presence of school policies requiring participation, reasons that schools encourage involvement, level of integration of service learning into the curriculum, program staffing, types of service-learning available to students, availability of support and professional development for teachers, presence of service-learning project evaluation measures, and sources of funding.
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file icon * Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Private Schools, 1998–1999 (FRSS 68): Public Use Data Files (NCES 2003-054)

Web Release: May 6, 2003

Abstract: This file contains data from a 1998–1999 quick-response survey, “Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Private Schools, 1998–1999 " (FRSS 68). The survey was completed by school officials at private elementary and secondary public schools. These officials were asked about Internet access and other information technology resources at their schools. Questions covered number and location of computers, Internet access, type of Internet connection, training, technical support, funding sources, and barriers to effective use of technology.
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