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Title:  WWC Review of the Report "Staying on Track: Testing Higher Achievement's Long-Term Impact on Academic Outcomes and High School Choice"
Description: The 2013 study, Staying on Track: Testing Higher Achievementís Long-Term Impact on Academic Outcomes and High School Choice, examined the effects of Higher Achievement, a multi-year afterschool and summer program for incoming fifth and sixth graders attending schools in at-risk communities. The program's goal is to improve academic achievement and encourage matriculation into an academically competitive high school. The study included 952 fifth and sixth graders in Washington, DC and Alexandria, Virginia. The researchers found that 4 years after randomization, students who were offered participation in Higher Achievement had significantly higher standardized test scores in mathematical problem solving. They were also significantly more likely than comparison students to be admitted to and matriculate at private high schools, and were less likely to apply to, be admitted to, and matriculate at noncompetitive public charter/magnet schools. No statistically significant differences were found for standardized tests of reading comprehension; application to private schools; application to, admittance to, or matriculation at competitive public charter/magnet schools; or matriculation at neighborhood public schools. This study is a well-executed randomized controlled trial that meets WWC evidence standards without reservations.
Online Availability:
Cover Date: April 2014
Web Release: April 15, 2014
Print Release: April 15, 2014
Publication #: WWC SSR10070
General Ordering Information
Center/Program: WWC
Associated Centers: NCEE
Authors: WWC
Type of Product: Single Study Review
Keywords:
Achievement
Students
Questions: For questions about the content of this Single Study Review, please contact:
Vanessa Anderson.
 
 
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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education