Skip Navigation
small NCES header image
Title:  Teacher Strategies to Help Fourth-Graders Having Difficulty in Reading: An International Perspective
Description: The Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) assesses the reading achievement of fourth-graders and collects data on their teachers’ reading instruction practices and strategies. Presenting data from the United States and the 44 other jurisdictions that participated in PIRLS 2006, this Statistics in Brief describes international patterns in the strategies reported by teachers to help fourth-graders falling behind in reading. These strategies include: (a) waiting to see if performance improves with maturation, (b) spending more time working on reading individually with that student, (c) having other students work on reading with the student having difficulty, (d) having the student work in the regular classroom with a teacher-aide, (e) having the student work in the regular classroom with a reading specialist, (f) having the student work in a remedial reading classroom with a reading specialist, (g) assigning homework to help the student catch up, (h) and asking the parents to help the student with reading. Asking the parents to help the student was among the most commonly cited strategies in 44 of the 45 jurisdictions. Working with a reading specialist in a regular classroom was among the least commonly cited strategies in 40 jurisdictions.
Online Availability:
Cover Date: October 2009
Web Release: September 29, 2009
Publication #: NCES 2009013
Center/Program: NCES
Authors: Anindita Sen, Stephanie Burns, and David Miller
Type of Product: Statistics in Brief
Survey/Program Areas: International Activities Program (IAP)
Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS)
Keywords:
Fourth-graders
International comparisons
Reading
Questions: For questions about the content of this Statistics in Brief, please contact:
Lisa Hudson.
 
 
Would you like to help us improve our products and website by taking a short survey?

YES, I would like to take the survey

or

No Thanks

The survey consists of a few short questions and takes less than one minute to complete.
National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education