Search Results: (1-15 of 28 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2016144 The Condition of Education 2016
NCES has a mandate to report to Congress on the condition of education by June 1 of each year. The Condition of Education 2016 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The 2016 report presents 43 key indicators on the status and condition of education and are grouped under four main areas: (1) population characteristics, (2) participation in education, (3) elementary and secondary education, and (4) postsecondary education. Also included in the report are 3 Spotlight indicators that provide a more in-depth look at some of the data.
5/26/2016
REL 2015045 Online and Distance Learning in Southwest Tennessee: Implementation and Challenges
The purpose of this study was to increase the understanding among members of the Southwest Tennessee Rural Education Cooperative (SWTREC), a coalition of superintendents from 12 districts (half of which are rural) surrounding Memphis, about the online and distance-learning courses offered by schools that compose the Cooperative. Data for this report were collected through an online questionnaire administered by districts in the SWTREC in April 2013 and completed by one person from each participating school. Seventeen of the twenty-one high schools within the SWTREC districts responded to the survey. More than 80 percent of responding schools reported offering online or distance-learning courses in school year 2012/13. On average, schools provided more online than distance-learning courses, and they had higher enrollments in online courses. Both online and distance-learning courses were used to provide students with access to dual enrollment courses. Schools that offered online courses most often identified the opportunity for students to accelerate credit accumulation as a "very important" reason for offering the courses. Technological limitations – both the availability of technology and restricted periods when technology was available – were barriers schools perceived in offering online and distance-learning courses.
11/12/2014
NCES 2015167 Profile of Undergraduate Students: 2011-12 (Web Tables)
These Web Tables are a comprehensive source of information on undergraduate students attending postsecondary institutions in the United States during the 2011–12 academic year. Data presented in these tables are from the 2011–12 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:12). Topics include enrollment and attendance status, degree program, major field of study, average grades, student characteristics (including sex, race/ethnicity, age, dependency status, income, marital status, responsibility for dependents, high school completion status, local residence while enrolled, citizenship status, and parents’ education), financial aid status and credit card debt, work, disability status, and participation in distance and remedial education.
10/2/2014
NCES 2014023 Enrollment in Distance Education Courses, by State: Fall 2012
These Web Tables use IPEDS data to provide insight into the impact of distance education courses on enrollment at the state level. Enrollment data from Fall 2012 were used as well as data collected on Institutional Characteristics regarding distance education.
6/2/2014
NCES 2013001 Dual Credit and Exam-Based Courses in U.S. Public High Schools: 2010-11
This report provides national estimates about dual credit courses at public high schools. The estimates presented in this report are based on a school survey about dual credit courses offered by high schools during the 2010-11 school year.
2/19/2013
NCES 2012009 Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 98): Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2009–10
This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled "Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary Students: 2009-10." This survey provides national estimates on distance education courses in public school districts, including enrollment in distance education courses, how districts monitor these courses, the motivations for providing distance education, and the technologies used for delivering distance education. NCES released the results of this survey in the First Look report “Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2009–10” (NCES 2012-008).

Questionnaires and cover letters were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled school district in November 2010. The letter stated the purpose of the study and asked that the definition of distance education be reviewed to determine who in the district would be best suited to provide the requested information. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in late November 2010 and completed in March 2011. The weighted response rate was 95 percent.

The survey asked respondents to report information on the number of distance education enrollments in their district. Respondents reported on whether the district tracked distance education course completions and if students enrolled in regular high school programs could take a full course load using only distance education courses. Data on the entities that developed and delivered distance education courses were also collected. Other survey topics included the types of distance education courses taken by students, whether the district plans to expand the number of distance education courses, and the technologies used for delivering distance education.
12/1/2011
NCES 2012008 Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2009–10
This report provides national estimates about distance education courses in public school districts. The estimates presented in this report are based on a district survey about distance education courses offered by the district or by any of the schools in the district during the 2009-10 school year.
11/29/2011
NCES 2012154 Learning at a Distance: Undergraduate Enrollment in Distance Education Courses and Degree Programs
This Statistics in Brief investigates undergraduates’ participation in distance education using nationally representative student-reported data collected through the three most recent administrations of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000, NPSAS:04, and NPSAS:08).
10/5/2011
NCES 2010205 Web Tables—Profile of Undergraduate Students 2007-08
These Web Tables are a comprehensive source of information on undergraduate students attending postsecondary institutions in the United States during the 2007–08 academic year. Data presented in these tables are from the 2007–08 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:08). Data include enrollment and attendance status, degree program, undergraduate major, average grades, student characteristics (including sex, race/ethnicity, age, dependency status, income, marital status, responsibility for dependents, high school completion status, local residence while enrolled, citizenship status, and parents’ education), financial aid status and credit card debt, work, community service, voting, disability status, and distance and remedial education.
9/7/2010
NCES 2010220 Web Tables—Profile of Undergraduate Students: Trends from Selected Years, 1995–96 to 2007–08
These Web Tables provide information on undergraduates during the 1995–96, 1999–2000, 2003–04, and 2007–08 academic years. Estimates are presented for all undergraduates, and for undergraduates who attended public 2- and 4-year, private nonprofit, and for-profit institutions by student and enrollment characteristics, hours worked while enrolled, and community service activities.
9/7/2010
NCES 2010035 Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 89): Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students, 2004-05
Abstract: This file contains data from a 2004-05 fast-response survey titled “Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students, 2004-05.” This survey provides national estimates for technology-based distance education courses in public elementary and secondary schools. NCES released the results of this district-level survey in the Statistical Analysis Report “Technology-Based Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002–03 and 2004–05” (NCES 2008-008).

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled district in November 2005. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the district’s director of curriculum and instruction, the technology coordinator, the distance education coordinator, or another staff member who was most knowledgeable about the district’s distance education courses. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse was completed at the end of May 2006. Telephone follow-up for quality control and data clarification was completed in November 2006. The weighted response rate was 96 percent.

For this survey, distance education courses were defined as credit-granting courses offered via audio, video, or Internet or other computer technologies to elementary and secondary school students enrolled in the district, in which the teacher and students were in different locations. The survey collected information on the percent of districts and the percent of schools (by instructional level) with students enrolled in technology-based distance education courses. The number of enrollments in distance education courses (by instructional level) was also collected. The survey contained questions on the completion status of the enrollments in distance education. Districts were asked to report the technologies used to deliver distance education courses and where students accessed online distance education courses (e.g., at school or at home). The survey included questions on whether technology-based distance education was used to offer Advanced Placement (AP) and college-level courses to students. Districts with students enrolled in technology-based distance education courses were asked whether they planned to expand their distance education courses.
6/29/2010
NCES 2009074 Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (PEQIS 16): Distance Education at Postsecondary Institutions, 2006-07
This file contains data from a quick-response survey titled "Distance Education at Postsecondary Institutions, 2006–07." The survey was conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, using the Postsecondary Education Quick Information System (PEQIS). It was designed to provide national estimates on distance education at 2-year and 4-year Title IV eligible, degree-granting institutions. Distance education was defined as a formal education process in which the student and instructor are not in the same place. NCES released the results of the survey in the publication Distance Education at Degree-Granting Postsecondary Institutions: 2006–07 (NCES 2009-044).

In fall 2007, questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the PEQIS survey coordinators at the approximately 1,600 Title IV degree-granting postsecondary institutions in the 50 states and the District of Columbia that compose the PEQIS panel. Coordinators were informed that the survey was designed to be completed by the person(s) at the institution most knowledgeable about the institution's distance education programs. Respondents were given the option of completing the survey online or on paper. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated 3 weeks after mailout and data collection was completed in March 2008. The responses rates were 90 percent unweighted and 87 percent weighted.

The 2006-07 study on distance education collected information on the prevalence, types, delivery, policies, and acquisition or development of distance education courses and programs. Instruction may be synchronous or asynchronous, and it may involve communication through the use of video, audio, or computer technologies, or by correspondence (which may include both written correspondence and the use of technology such as CD-ROM). The questionnaire instructed institutions to include distance education courses and programs that were formally designated as online, hybrid/blended online, and other distance education courses and programs. Hybrid/blended online courses were defined as a combination of online and in-class instruction with reduced in-class seat time for students.
9/24/2009
NCES 2009044 Distance Education at Degree-Granting Postsecondary Institutions: 2006-07
This report presents findings from "Distance Education at Postsecondary Institutions: 2006-07", a survey that was designed to provide national estimates on distance education at 2-year and 4-year Title IV eligible, degree-granting institutions. Distance education was defined as a formal education process in which the student and instructor are not in the same place. Thus, instruction may be synchronous or asynchronous, and it may involve communication through the use of video, audio, or computer technologies, or by correspondence (which may include both written correspondence and the use of technology such as CD-ROM). The questionnaire instructed institutions to include distance education courses and programs that were formally designated as online, hybrid/blended online, and other distance education courses and programs. Hybrid/blended online courses were defined as a combination of online and in-class instruction with reduced in-class seat time for students.

The 2006-07 study on distance education collected information on the prevalence, types, delivery, policies, and acquisition or development of distance education courses and programs. Findings indicate that during the 2006-07 academic year, two-thirds (66 percent) of 2-year and 4-year Title IV degree-granting postsecondary institutions reported offering online, hybrid/blended online, or other distance education courses for any level or audience. Sixty-five percent of the institutions reported college-level credit-granting distance education courses, and 23 percent of the institutions reported noncredit distance education courses. Sixty-one percent of 2-year and 4-year institutions reported offering online courses, 35 percent reported hybrid/blended courses, and 26 percent reported other types of college-level credit-granting distance education courses. Together, distance education courses accounted for an estimated 12.2 million enrollments (or registrations). Asynchronous (not simultaneous or real-time) Internet-based technologies were cited as the most widely used technology for the instructional delivery of distance education courses; they were used to a large extent in 75 percent and to a moderate extent in 17 percent of the institutions that offered college-level credit-granting distance education courses. The most common factors cited as affecting distance education decisions to a major extent were meeting student demand for flexible schedules, providing access to college for students who would otherwise not have access, making more courses available, and seeking to increase student enrollment.
12/30/2008
NCES 2008008 Technology-Based Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002–03 and 2004–05
This report details findings from "Technology-Based Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2004-05," a survey that was designed to provide policymakers, researchers, and educators with information about technology-based distance education courses in public elementary and secondary schools nationwide. This report also compares these findings with baseline data collected in 2002-03, and provides longitudinal analysis of change in the districts that responded to both the 2002-03 and 2004-05 surveys. For these two surveys, distance education courses were defined as credit-granting courses offered via audio, video, or Internet or other computer technologies to elementary and secondary school students enrolled in the district, in which the teacher and students were in different locations. Findings indicate that 37 percent of public school districts and 10 percent of all public schools nationwide had students enrolled in technology-based distance education courses during 2004-05. During 2002-03, 36 percent of districts and 9 percent of schools had students enrolled in technology-based distance education courses. About a quarter (26 percent) of school districts that existed in both 2002-03 and 2004-05 had students enrolled in technology-based distance education in both school years, 11 percent did not have students in this type of education in 2002-03 but had such enrollments in 2004-05, and an equal percentage of districts (11 percent) had students enrolled in technology-based distance education in 2002-03 but not in 2004-05. The number of enrollments in technology-based distance education courses increased from an estimated 317,070 enrollments in 2002-03 to 506,950 in 2004-05. The number of enrollments varied considerably among districts, although the majority of districts (57 percent) reported between one and 20 technology-based distance education enrollments in 2004-05. Distance education was more commonly offered by high schools than by schools at any other level, with 61 percent of technology-based distance education enrollments at the high school level. Seventy-one percent of districts with students enrolled in technology-based distance education courses in 2004-05 planned to expand their distance education courses in the future.
6/27/2008
NCES 2007064 The Condition of Education 2007
The Condition of Education 2007 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 48 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis on high school coursetaking. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2007 print edition includes 48 indicators in five main areas: (1) participation in education; (2) learner outcomes; (3) student effort and educational progress; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education; and (5) the contexts of postsecondary education.
5/31/2007
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