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Search Results: (31-34 of 34 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCSER 20063001 Facts from NLTS2: General Education Participation and Academic Performance of Students With Learning Disabilities
The National Center for Special Education Research at the Institute of Education Sciences has released a brief report from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2. This report focuses on youth, ages 14-18 and classified as having learning disabilities, who were receiving special education services during the 2000-01 school year.
8/16/2006
NCSER 2006NLTS2B Briefing From NLTS2: The National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2)
On Wednesday, June 14th, SRI International project staff gave a briefing on the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2. The focus was on data collected in 2003 from youth, ages 15-19, during Wave 2 of the study. The presentation addressed the question, "What is life like for youth with disabilities, as seen through their own eyes?" These data reveal youths' perceptions of themselves; their school experience; the services and supports they receive; personal relationships; and their expectations for the future. Data from Wave 3, collected 2 years later in 2005, provides a backdrop for interpreting the results.
6/24/2006
NCSER 2005NLTS2 Facts From NLTS2: High School Completion by Youth with Disabilities
The National Center for Special Education Research at the Institute of Education Sciences has released a brief report from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 entitled Facts From NLTS2: High School Completion by Youth with Disabilities. There has been an increase over time in the percentage of youth with disabilities who complete high school. However, this mark of success is much more common for some youth than others. Those with sensory or orthopedic impairments finish school at much higher rates, for example, than youth with multiple disabilities or emotional disturbances.

Whether youth with disabilities finish or drop out of high school is associated with marked differences in their experiences in the early postschool years. A high school diploma gives graduates with disabilities access to a college education that is unavailable to most dropouts. Although the two groups are equally likely to be working for pay after school, dropouts work longer hours, on average, thereby generating greater income.
5/24/2006
NCSER 2006NLTS2F Facts From NLTS2: School Behavior and Disciplinary Experiences of Youth With Disabilities
The National Center for Special Education Research at the Institute of Education Sciences has released a brief report from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 entitled Facts From NLTS2: School Behavior and Disciplinary Experiences of Youth With Disabilities. Although most secondary-school-age youth with disabilities are reported to behave appropriately, approximately 20 percent to 40 percent are reported to exhibit problem behaviors at school, including not controlling behavior and arguing with others in class. One-third of students with disabilities have experienced disciplinary actions at school, such as suspensions, expulsions, referrals to the principal’s office, or detentions, and they are more likely than their peers in the general population to have faced these types of disciplinary actions.

Students with emotional disturbances are significantly more likely to have been suspended or expelled in one school year or over their school careers than youth in all other disability categories.
5/2/2006
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