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Statistical Analysis Report:

Institutional Aid: 1992-93

September 1997

(NCES 98-104) Ordering information

Highlights

This report examines institutional aid awards among students who were enrolled in postsecondary education in 1992-93, using nationally representative data on student financial aid and background characteristics. Features of the institutions that these students attended, as well as characteristics of the students themselves, were examined in relation to the presence and size of institutional aid awards they received. The highlights here summarize the results of these analyses.

Context:

  • Institutional aid has increased at a faster rate since 1985 than any other source of student financial aid, while the real value of government aid awards declined, real tuition costs rose, and family income remained about the same.
  • Institutional aid provided $7.5 billion to students in 1992-93. Twelve percent of all undergraduates received institutional aid in 1992-93 (table 2, table 16).

Relationship between institutional characteristics and receipt of institutional aid:

  • Receipt of institutional aid varied by the level of the institution attended: undergraduates in less-than-4-year public and private, not-for-profit institutions were less likely to receive institutional aid than those in similar 4-year institutions (table 2).
  • Receipt and amount of institutional aid also varied by the control of the institution attended. Full-time undergraduates in private 4-year institutions were more than twice as likely to receive institutional aid as undergraduates in public 4-year institutions. Students attending private, for-profit institutions were less than half as likely to receive aid as students at public 4-year institutions (table 2). The average institutional aid award to undergraduates who received this type of aid in public 4-year institutions was $1,755, compared to $4,658 to students at private 4-year institutions (table 4).
  • The size of institutional aid awards received varied by the Carnegie classification of the school attended among students at both public and private institutions. Undergraduates attending public research and doctoral granting institutions received larger average institutional aid awards than those attending public comprehensive and specialized institutions. Students attending private research and doctoral granting institutions received larger average institutional aid awards than those attending institutions in all other Carnegie Code categories (table 5).
  • The average institutional aid award received by full-time undergraduates in 4-year institutions increased as tuition increased in both public and private, not-for profit institutions (table 18, table 21).
  • There was no significant difference in the proportion of full-time undergraduates receiving institutional aid in private 4-year institutions with low or high endowment levels; the average amount of institutional aid increased with endowment (table 7).

Student characteristics of institutional aid recipients in 4-year institutions:

  • Several characteristics associated with “traditional” undergraduates were also associated with a greater likelihood of receiving institutional aid. Part-time undergraduates were less likely to receive institutional aid than those attending full time (table 2). Full-time undergraduates who were less than 24 years old were more likely to receive institutional aid than those in any other age bracket. Full-time undergraduates living on campus were more likely to receive institutional aid than those living off campus or with their parents (table 12).
  • In both public and private 4-year institutions, full-time undergraduates with a 3.50 or higher grade point average were more likely to receive institutional aid than undergraduates with a GPA below 3.50 (table 11).
  • Black, non-Hispanic, but not Hispanic, full-time undergraduates in public institutions were more likely to receive institutional aid than white, non-Hispanic undergraduates (table 13). Neither black, non-Hispanic nor Hispanic full-time undergraduates in private, not-for profit, 4-year institutions differed significantly in their probability of receiving institutional aid compared to white, non-Hispanic undergraduates.

Student income and packaging of aid:

  • Full-time undergraduates in the lowest income quartile attending public 4-year institutions were more likely to receive institutional aid than undergraduates in higher income quartiles. Comparable students attending private 4-year institutions were significantly more likely to receive this aid than those in the highest income quartile (table 8).
  • Eighteen percent of the full-time undergraduate institutional aid recipients in private 4-year institutions received institutional aid alone and 32 percent received it with a Pell Grant. Thirty-five percent of the undergraduates in public 4-year institutions received institutional aid by itself and 38 percent received it with a financial aid package that contained a Pell Grant (table 10).

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For more information about the content of this report, contact Dennis Carroll at Dennis.Carroll@ed.gov.



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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education