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Characteristics of Student Victims of Crime at School

Victimization at school may be associated with student characteristics (including sex, race/ ethnicity, grade level, and household income) or school characteristics (for example, whether a school is public or private). The relationships between these characteristics and student victimization are examined below.

Sex

In school year 2008–09, a larger percentage of male students than female students were the victim of any crime at school (4.6 percent vs. 3.2 percent) (table 2). A higher percentage of males than females reported being the victim of theft (3.4 percent vs. 2.1 percent), but there was no measurable difference between the percentages of male and female students who reported being the victim of violent crime (1.6 percent and 1.1 percent, respectively). A higher percentage of both male and female students reported a theft victimization than a violent victimization: 3.4 percent of males reported a theft victimization versus 1.6 percent who reported a violent victimization, and 2.1 percent of females reported a theft victimization versus 1.1 percent who reported a violent victimization.

Race/Ethnicity7

No measurable differences were found among the percentages of White, Black, Hispanic students, and students of all other races who reported being the victims of any crime, theft, or violent crime at school in school year 2008–09 (table 2). Among both White and Hispanic students, a higher percentage of students were victims of theft than of violent crime (2.9 percent vs. 1.2 percent for White students; and 3.0 percent vs. 1.3 percent for Hispanic students).

Grade Level

In school year 2008–09, a higher percentage of students in grade 9 reported theft victimization (4.9 percent) than did students in grades 7 or 8 (2.1 percent and 2.0 percent, respectively) (table 2). In addition, higher percentages of students in grades 9, 10, and 11 reported theft victimization (4.9 percent, 3.5 percent, and 3.3 percent, respectively) than did students in grades 6 or 12 (1.3 percent and 1.5 percent, respectively). No measurable differences were found between the percentages of students in grades 6–11 who were victims of violent crime.

Household Income8

No measurable differences were found among household income levels and the percentages of students who reported being victims of any crime, theft, or violent crime at school in school year 2008–09 (table 2).

School Sector (Public/Private)

The percentage of public school students who reported being victims of any crime (4.1 percent) was higher than that of private school students (1.8 percent) in school year 2008–09 (table 2).


7 Respondents who identified themselves as being of Hispanic or Latino origin were classified as "Hispanic or Latino," regardless of their race. "Black, not Hispanic or Latino" includes African Americans. "All other races, not Hispanic or Latino" includes American Indians or Alaska Natives, Asians, Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders, and respondents of two or more races (1 percent of all respondents). For ease of presentation here and for the remainder of the report, White, not Hispanic or Latino students are referred to as White students; Black, not Hispanic or Latino students are referred to as Black students; and Hispanic or Latino students are referred to as Hispanic students.
8 The household income categories presented in this report are a recoding of the 14 categories offered in the NCVS-1 Basic Screen Questionnaire. Adjacent categories were collapsed to be consistent with other NCES products produced from this dataset (see the table library at the NCES Crime and Safety Surveys portal at http://nces.ed.gov/programs/crime). Readers should use caution when interpreting the results of analysis from these collapsed categories. As with all categorical data, these results may differ from those produced using different category breakdowns.


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