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Victimization at School

In their analysis of data from the 1995, 1999, 2001, 2003, and 2005 administrations of the SCS, Robers et al. (2010) found a decrease in the percentage of students ages 12 through 18 reportingcriminal victimization at school in the 6 months prior to the survey. While 9.5 percent of students reported being victims of any crime at school in 1995, about 4.3 percent reported being victims of any crime at school in 2005. In 1995, about 7.1 percent of students reported being victims of theft, compared to 3.1 percent in 2005. Three percent of students reported being victims of violent crime in 1995, compared to 1.2 percent in 2005. In both 1995 and 2005, less than 1 percent of students reported a serious violent victimization. However, between 2005 and 2007, there were no measurable changes in the percentage of students reporting any type of criminal victimization. This report supplements the findings of Robers et al. (2010) by providing the most recent data from the 2009 SCS and detailing the relationship between reports of school crime and characteristics of students and schools.

In school year 2008–09, about 3.9 percent of students were victims of any crime at school, 2.8 percent were victims of theft, 1.4 percent were victims of a violent crime, and 0.3 percent were victims of a serious violent crime (table 1).5,6 Furthermore, 1.1 percent of students reported being victims of a simple assault at school (classified as a violent crime, but not a serious violent crime). Subsequent sections of this report elaborate on the relationships among characteristics of student victims and nonvictims of violent crime and theft at school as well as student victim status and student reports of school conditions, security measures at school, and fear and avoidance behaviors.


5 Student reports of "theft" and "violent" victimization may not sum to "any" victimization because respondents can report more than one victimization.
6 Estimates for serious violent victimization are only provided in detail in table 1. Because the percentage of students who experienced this type of victimization was not large enough to present meaningful cross-tabulations, tables 2 through 7 include estimates for serious violent victimization in the estimates for violent victimization.


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