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Chapter 6: Postsecondary Education

Indicator 38: Reasons for Leaving

A higher percentage of 200304 beginning postsecondary male students than female students left college by 2004 without completing a degree or certificate program (17 vs.15 percent). Among students who left without completing, a higher percentage of males than females reported financial reasons for leaving (40 vs. 23 percent).

About 16 percent of students who began at a post- secondary institution in 200304 had left college by 2004 without completing a degree or certificate program. A higher percentage of male than female students left college without completing (17 vs. 15 percent). The same pattern was observed between White males and White females (17 vs. 14 percent); however, no measurable differences were found between males and females within other racial/ethnic groups.

The percentage of 200304 beginning postsecondary students who left college by 2004 without completing a degree or certificate program varied by race/ethnicity. A lower percentage of White students left college without completing a degree or certificate program (15 percent) than did Hispanic (18 percent) and Black students (20 percent). In addition, the percentage of Asian students who left college without completing (10 percent) was lower than the percentages of students of two or more races (16 percent), White, Hispanic, and Black students. Among male 200304 beginning postsecondary students, a lower percentage of White students than Black students left by 2004 without completing (17 vs. 22 percent); and the percentage of Asian students who left without completing (9 percent) was lower than the percentages of White students, Hispanic students (19 percent), students of two or more races (20 percent), and Black students. Among females, a lower percentage of White students (14 percent) than Hispanic students (17 percent) and Black students (20 percent) left without completing; and the percentage of Asian students who left without completing (12 percent) was lower than the corresponding percentage of Black students.

Among 200304 beginning postsecondary students who left in 2004 without completing a degree or certificate program, 31 percent reported that they left their institution due to financial reasons. A higher percentage of males than females reported financial reasons for leaving (40 vs. 23 percent). In addition, the percentage differences between males and females who left due to financial reasons followed a similar pattern within the racial/ethnic groups of White students, Hispanic students, and students of two or more races. For example, approximately 59 percent of Hispanic males reported financial reasons for leaving, compared with 18 percent of Hispanic females.

A lower percentage of Asian students (19 percent) than Hispanic students (35 percent) and students of two or more races (38 percent) reported leaving for financial reasons. Among male students, the percentages of Blacks (33 percent) and Whites (36 percent) who reported financial reasons for leaving were lower than the corresponding percentages of students of two or more races (56 percent) and Hispanics (59 percent). No measurable differences were found by race/ethnicity among female students.

Technical Notes

This indicator uses a specific variable from the 200304 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study, First Follow-up (BPS:04/06) that indicates a student’s enrollment or departure status at the end of the first year of enrollment (i.e., 2004). Therefore, this indicator does not capture the enrollment or departure status of students who left after their first year.

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Figure 38-1 Percentage of 200304 beginning postsecondary students who left school by 2004 without completing a program, by race/ethnicity and sex: 2004

Figure 38-2 Percentage of 200304 beginning postsecondary students who left school by 2004 without completing a program and reported financial reasons for leaving, by race/ethnicity and sex: 2004

Table E-38-1 Percentage of 200304 beginning postsecondary students who left school by 2004 without completing a program and the reported reasons for leaving, by sex and race/ethnicity: 2004


  
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