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Chapter 6: Postsecondary Education

Indicator 33: Enrollment Rates for 18- to 24-Year-Olds

In 2010, a lower percentage of 18- to 24-year-old males than females were enrolled in college or graduate school (39 vs. 47 percent). A higher percentage of 18- to 24-year-old males than females were still enrolled in high school in 2010 (10 vs. 8 percent).

In 2010, some 9 percent of 18- to 24-year-olds were still enrolled in high school, 43 percent were enrolled in college or graduate school, and another 7 percent had completed an associate’s, bachelor’s, or higher degree and were no longer enrolled. In the same year, about 10 percent of 18- to 24-year-olds were not currently enrolled in school and had not earned a high school credential (either a diploma or an equivalency credential such as a General Educational Development [GED] certificate).

A higher percentage of male than female 18- to 24-year-olds were still enrolled in high school in 2010 (10 vs. 8 percent). This pattern was also observed for Whites (9 vs. 7 percent), Blacks (13 vs. 10 percent), Asians (7 vs. 6 percent), Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (10 vs. 4 percent), and persons of two or more races (12 vs. 9 percent). Overall, higher percentages of Black (12 percent), American Indian (10 percent), and Hispanic (10 percent) young adults and young adults of two or more races (11 percent) were still enrolled in high school than Whites (8 percent) or Asians (7 percent). The percentage of Blacks still enrolled in high school was also higher than the percentages of Hispanics and Native Hawaiians/ Pacific Islanders (both 7 percent).

In 2010, a higher percentage of male than female 18- to 24-year-olds were not enrolled in school and had not completed high school (12 vs. 8 percent). This pattern was also found for Whites (7 vs. 5 percent), Blacks (15 vs. 9 percent), Hispanics (24 vs. 16 percent), Asians (4 vs. 3 percent), American Indians (21 vs. 15 percent), and persons of two or more races (9 vs. 6 percent). Differences in high school completion were also found across racial/ ethnic groups. Higher percentages of Hispanics (20 percent), American Indians (18 percent), Alaska Natives (16 percent), and Blacks (12 percent) were not currently enrolled in school and had not completed high school compared to persons of two or more races (7 percent), Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (6 percent), Whites (6 percent), and Asians (3 percent). The percentage of Hispanics who had not completed high school was also higher than the percentages of Blacks and American Indians.

In 2010, a lower percentage of male than female 18- to 24-year-olds were enrolled in either college or graduate school (39 vs. 47 percent). This pattern was also observed for Whites (43 vs. 51 percent), Blacks (31 vs. 43 percent), Hispanics (26 vs. 36 percent), American Indians (24 vs. 33 percent), and persons of two or more races (40 vs. 49 percent). The percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds enrolled in college or graduate school differed across racial/ethnic groups. A higher percentage of Asians (66 percent) than all other racial/ethnic groups were enrolled in college or graduate school. Whites had higher college or graduate school enrollment rates (47 percent) than persons of two or more races (45 percent), and both of these racial/ ethnic groups had higher enrollment rates than Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (39 percent), Blacks (37 percent), Hispanics (31 percent), American Indians (28 percent), and Alaska Natives (19 percent). College or graduate school enrollment rates were higher for Blacks than for Hispanics; in addition, Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders had higher college or graduate school enrollment rates than American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Hispanics born outside of the United States may not have had access to the same educational opportunities as Hispanics born within the United States. Therefore, examining high school completion and college or graduate school enrollment rates by nativity helps highlight the experiences of young adults who may not have attended primary or secondary school in the United States. In 2010, over one-third of Hispanics born outside of the United States (36 percent) had not completed high school and were not currently enrolled compared to 13 percent of Hispanics born within the United States. In addition, a lower percentage of Hispanics born outside the United States were enrolled in college or graduate school than Hispanics born within the United States (17 vs. 37 percent).

A higher percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds were enrolled either in college or graduate school in 2010 than in 2006 (43 vs. 40 percent). This finding was also true for males (39 vs. 36 percent) and females (47 vs. 44 percent). The percentage of those enrolled in either college or graduate school were higher in 2010 than in 2006 for Asians (66 vs. 62 percent), Whites (47 vs. 44 percent), Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (39 vs. 31 percent), Blacks (37 vs. 32 percent), Hispanics (31 vs. 25 percent), and American Indians (28 vs. 24 percent). Asian, White, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, Black, and Hispanic males and Asian, White, Black, Hispanic, and American Indian females also had higher college or graduate school enrollment rates in 2010 than in 2006.

Technical Notes

Born within the United States refers to the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Northern Marianas, and those born abroad of American parents. The American Community Survey includes noninstitutionalized and institutionalized group quarters. Noninstitutionalized group quarters include college and university housing, military quarters, facilities for workers and religious groups, and temporary shelters for the homeless. Institutionalized group quarters include adult and juvenile correctional facilities, nursing facilities, and other health care facilities.

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Figure 33-1 Percentage distribution of 18- to 24-year-olds in the household and group quarters population, by race/ethnicity, sex, and school enrollment status: 2010

Figure 33-2 Percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds in the household and group quarters population enrolled in college or graduate school, by race/ethnicity and sex: 2010

Table E-33-1 Number and percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds in the household and group quarters population, by school enrollment status, sex, race/ethnicity, and nativity: 2010

Table E-33-2 Number and percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds in the household and group quarters population, by school enrollment status, sex, race/ethnicity, and nativity: 2006


  
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