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Chapter 4: Academic Preparation and Achievement

Indicator 26: Status Dropout Rates

In 2010, the status dropout rate was higher for males (8 percent) than for females (6 percent). This pattern was also found for Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics. Females of two or more races, however, had higher status dropout rates (8 percent) than their male counterparts (2 percent). No measurable differences in status dropout rates by sex were found for Asians or American Indians/Alaska Natives.

The status dropout rate represents the percentage of 16- through 24-year-olds who are not enrolled in school and have not earned a high school credential (either a diploma or an equivalency credential such as a General Educational Development [GED] certificate). In 2010, the status dropout rate was 7 percent.

Status dropout rates varied across racial/ethnic groups. In 2010, status dropout rates were higher for Hispanics (15 percent) than for Whites (5 percent), Blacks (8 percent), Asians (4 percent), Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (5 percent), and persons of two or more races (5 percent). Blacks had higher status dropout rates than Whites and Asians. In addition, American Indians/ Alaska Natives (12 percent) had higher dropout rates than Whites, Asians, and persons of two or more races.

Overall, the status dropout rate in 2010 was higher for males (8 percent) than for females (6 percent). This pattern was also found for Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics. Females of two or more races, however, had higher status dropout rates (8 percent) than their male counterparts (2 percent). No measurable differences in status dropout rates by sex were found for Asians or American Indians/Alaska Natives.

Among males, status dropout rates were higher for Hispanics (17 percent) than for Whites (6 percent), Blacks (9 percent), Asians (4 percent), or Native Hawaiians/ Pacific Islanders (8 percent). Black males (9 percent) had higher status dropout rates than White (6 percent) and Asian (4 percent) males. Among females, status dropout rates were higher for Hispanics (13 percent) than Whites (4 percent), Blacks (7 percent), or Asians (5 percent). Black females had higher status dropout rates than White females. American Indian/Alaska Native females (14 percent) had higher dropout rates than Asian and White females, but no measurable differences were found between American Indian/Alaska Native females and females from any other racial/ethnic group in 2010.

Comparisons between 2008 and 2010 revealed some differences. Overall, the status dropout rate was higher in 2008 than in 2010 (8 vs. 7 percent). This finding was also true for Blacks (10 vs. 8 percent) and Hispanics (18 vs. 15 percent). Among males, no measurable differences either overall or by race/ethnicity were found between 2008 and 2010. However, females had a higher status dropout rate in 2008 than in 2010 (8 vs. 6 percent). This finding was also true for Black females (11 vs. 7 percent) and Hispanic females (17 vs. 13 percent).

Technical Notes

The Current Population Survey (CPS) estimates of the status dropout rate include civilian, noninstitutionalized 16- through 24-year-olds. Young adults in the military or those who are incarcerated, for instance, are not included in the CPS measure.


Figure 26-1 Status dropout rates of 16- through 24-year-olds in the civilian, noninstitutionalized population, by race/ethnicity and sex: October Supplement, 2010

Table E-26-1 Status dropout rates of 16- through 24-year-olds in the civilian, noninstitutionalized population, by race/ethnicity, year, and sex: October Supplement, 200810


  
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