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Chapter 3: Student Behaviors and Afterschool Activities

Indicator 15: Part-Time Work

The percentages of White male and female high school students who were employed in 2010 were higher than the percentages of male and female high school students of other races/ethnicities who were employed, including Blacks, Hispanics, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. Among high school students who worked, however, the percentages of Black and Hispanic males who worked more than 20 hours per week were higher than the percentage of White males who did so.

In 2010, about 17 percent of high school students ages 16 and older were employed. A higher percentage of female than male students were employed, both overall and among White and American Indian/Alaska Native students. For example, among American Indians/ Alaska Natives, 9 percent of females versus 2 percent of males were employed. In terms of overall racial/ethnic differences, higher percentages of White students and students of two or more races were employed than their peers in the other racial/ethnic groups. The employment percentages were as follows: Whites (22 percent), persons of two or more races (17 percent), Hispanics (12 percent), Blacks (11 percent), Asians (8 percent), and American Indians/Alaska Natives (5 percent). Employment percentages were also higher for Blacks and Hispanics than for Asians and American Indians/Alaska Natives. Racial/ethnic patterns for male students were generally similar to the overall racial/ethnic pattern. Among females, a higher percentage of White students than of Black, Hispanic, Asian, and American Indian/Alaska Native students were employed. The percentages of females who were employed were also higher for Black and Hispanic students and students of two or more races than for Asian students.

The number of hours that students who were employed in 2010 worked each week varied: 29 percent worked less than 10 hours, 55 percent worked 1020 hours, and 16 percent worked more than 20 hours. A higher percentage of employed males than employed females worked more than 20 hours per week, both overall and among Blacks (33 vs. 19 percent). In terms of overall differences by race/ ethnicity in the percentages of employed students who worked more than 20 hours per week, the percentages of Black and Hispanic students working at this level (26 and 21 percent, respectively) were higher than the percentages of White students and students of two or more races working at this level (14 and 13 percent, respectively). In addition, the percentage of Black students working at this level was higher than the percentage of Hispanic students doing so. Among males, the percentages of employed students who worked more than 20 hours per week were higher for Blacks and Hispanics than for Whites and were higher for Blacks than for Hispanics. Among employed female students, the percentage working at this level was higher for Hispanics than for Whites.

Technical Notes

High school students include those in grades 9 through 12. Employment status refers to the full calendar week prior to the week when the respondent answered the questions. Estimates for those employed include those who worked zero hours in the previous week.


Figure 15-1 Percentage of employed high school students ages 16 and older, by race/ethnicity and sex: 2010

Figure 15-2. Percentage of employed high school students ages 16 and older who worked more than 20 hours per week, by race/ethnicity and sex: 2010

Table E-15-1 Percentage of high school students ages 16 and older who were employed and the percentage distribution of hours worked per week, by sex and race/ethnicity: 2010


  
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