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Table 148. Percentage distribution and standard error for public elementary school music and visual arts specialists reporting the extent to which they believed various types of support for teaching their arts subject were adequate: School year 19992000
 
Type of support Not at all adequate Minimally adequate Moderately adequate Completely adequate
Percent Standard
error
Percent Standard
error
Percent Standard
error
Percent Standard
error
                 
Music specialist                
Instructional time with students 2! (0.9) 30 (2.8) 49 (2.9) 18 (2.3)
Time for individual or collaborative planning 23 (2.2) 38 (2.7) 29 (2.5) 10 (1.7)
Dedicated room or space for music instruction 15 (1.9) 21 (2.1) 29 (2.5) 36 (2.1)
Instructional resources—Materials/supplies for music instruction (e.g., sheet music, subscriptions, CDs/CROMs, textbooks, DVDs, software) 6 (1.3) 31 (2.5) 37 (2.2) 26 (2.5)
Classroom instruments—Instruments typically used by students in the music classroom (e.g., rhythm band sets, recorders, autoharps, Orff instruments, drums and ethnic percussion, guitar/ukulele) 10 (1.4) 25 (1.8) 42 (2.9) 23 (2.5)
Classroom equipment—Equipment typically used by teachers in the music classroom (e.g., piano/digital keyboard, stereo system with a CD player, mp3 player and sound dock, LCD projector) 4 (0.9) 17 (1.6) 37 (2.8) 43 (2.8)
Technologies—Electronic equipment used in the study or creation of music (e.g., SMART Boards, computers, MIDI keyboards, sequencers) 51 (2.7) 26 (2.5) 16 (2.0) 7 (1.3)
Orchestra and band instruments—Instruments available for students wishing to participate in the school string/orchestra or band program1 12 (2.3) 35 (3.8) 37 (4.0) 13 (2.6)
                 
Visual arts specialist                
Instructional time with students 3! (1.2) 27 (3.0) 41 (3.1) 29 (2.6)
Time for individual or collaborative planning 23 (2.5) 36 (2.5) 28 (2.6) 13 (2.3)
Dedicated room or space for visual arts instruction 16 (2.5) 16 (2.0) 28 (2.7) 40 (2.9)
Instructional resources—Reusable resources used for instruction in visual arts (e.g., art prints, slides, textbooks, videotapes, art periodicals, projectors). 11 (1.8) 29 (2.9) 36 (3.2) 24 (2.7)
Art materials—Expendable resources (e.g., paint, ink, clay, paper, cardboard, film, wood, plastic films) (†) 17 (2.6) 47 (3.0) 35 (2.9)
Art tools—Equipment used to create and learn about visual arts (e.g., brushes, scissors, brayers, clay tools) (†) 19 (2.5) 45 (2.8) 36 (2.6)
Classroom equipment—Equipment used to create and learn about visual arts (e.g., cameras, kilns, display cases and display boards, easels) 16 (2.4) 30 (2.5) 33 (2.8) 21 (2.3)
Technologies—Electronic equipment used in the study and creation of art (e.g., SMART Boards, computers, computer software, scanners, printers, video equipment) 30 (2.9) 37 (3.0) 20 (2.6) 13 (2.2)
† Not applicable.
‡ Reporting standards not met.
! Interpret data with caution; the coefficient of variation is greater than or equal to 30 percent.
1 Percents are based on the 72 percent of music specialists at public elementary schools with string/orchestra or band programs in the 1999–2000 school year.
NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. The data presented in this table may differ from previously published information because missing data from the 1999–2000 surveys were imputed for analysis in this report. Arts specialists are education professionals with a teaching certificate in an arts discipline—such as music, visual arts, dance, or drama/theatre—who provide separate instruction in that discipline.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fast Response Survey System, “Survey of Elementary School Music Specialists,” FRSS 77M; and “Survey of Elementary School Visual Arts Specialists,” FRSS 77VA, 1999–2000.

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