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Selected Findings: 2009–10

  • Of the teachers who began teaching in public schools in 2007 or 2008, about 10 percent were not teaching in 2008–09, and 12 percent were not teaching in 2009–10 (table 1).

  • Among beginning public school teachers who were assigned a mentor in 2007–08, about 8 percent were not teaching in 2008–09 and 10 percent were not teaching in 2009–10. In contrast, among the beginning public school teachers who were not assigned a mentor in 2007–08, about 16 percent were not teaching in 2008–09 and 23 percent were not teaching in 2009–10 (table 2).

  • Approximately 93 percent of beginning public school teachers who were earning less than $40,000 in 2008–09 remained teachers in 2009–10, and about 96 percent of beginning public school teachers who were earning $40,000 or more in 2008–09 remained teachers in 2009–10 (table 3).

  • Of the beginning public school teachers, about 74 percent were teaching in the same school in 2009–10 as in the previous school year (stayers), about 10 percent were teaching in a different school in 2009–10 than the previous school year (movers), about 3 percent had returned to teaching in 2009–10 after a year of not teaching (returners), and about 12 percent were not teaching in 2009–10 (table 4).

  • Approximately 21 percent of 2008–09 movers and 27 percent of 2009–10 movers moved across schools because their contract was not renewed. About 31 percent of 2008–09 leavers and 35 percent of 2009–10 leavers left the teaching profession because their contract was not renewed (table 5).

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