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Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Minorities
NCES 2010-015
July 2010

Indicator 2. Nativity

The population in the United States born outside of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (referred to in this indicator as "born outside the United States") increased between 2000 and 2007, making up 12 percent of the U.S. population in 2000 and 14 percent in 2007. The percentage of children born outside the U.S., however, has remained steady since 2000 at 5 percent of the U.S. population.

In the United States in 2007, about 5 percent of the 73.9 million children under age 18 were born outside of the United States. Some 24 percent of Asian children were born outside the United States, a higher percentage than any other race/ethnicity except Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. The percentages of Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (21 percent) and Hispanic (11 percent) children who were born outside the United States were also higher than those for children of two or more races (3 percent), Black children (3 percent), White children (2 percent), and American Indian/Alaska Native children (0.4 percent). Between 2000 and 2007, the percentage of children under age 18 who were born outside the United States increased by 7 percentage points for Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders and decreased for Hispanics and Asians by 3 and 2 percentage points, respectively.

In 2007, some 14 percent of the total population was born outside the United States. The percentage of the total population born outside the United States was higher than the percentage of children born outside the United States for all racial/ethnic groups. Among the racial/ethnic groups, 69 percent of Asians, 44 percent of Hispanics, 40 percent of Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders, 8 percent of Blacks, 7 percent of those of two or more races, 5 percent of Whites, and 2 percent of American Indians/Alaska Natives were born outside the United States. Between 2000 and 2007, the percentage of Blacks and Native Hawaiians or other Pacific Islanders who were born outside the United States increased. However, during the same period, there was a decline in the percentage of persons of two or more races born outside the United States.

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View Table View Table 2a

Snapshot of Hispanic and Asian Subgroups: Nativity

The two racial/ethnic groups whose populations had the largest proportions of persons born outside the United States in 2007 were Asians and Hispanics. About 69 percent of the 13.1 million Asians and 44 percent of the 45.4 million Hispanics living in the United States in 2007 were born outside the 50 states and District of Columbia.

Among children born outside of the United States under the age of 18 in 2007, some 49 percent were Hispanic and 19 percent were Asian. Approximately 32 percent of all children born outside the United States were Mexican, a higher percentage than any other Hispanic subgroup. About 4 percent of children born outside the United States were South American, 4 percent were Puerto Rican, 3 percent were Other Central American, 2 percent were Dominican, 2 percent were Salvadoran, and 1 percent each were Cuban and Other Hispanic/Latino. Some 19 percent of all children born outside the United States were Asian, with children in the following subgroups: Chinese children (5 percent), Asian Indian children (4 percent), Filipino and Korean children (3 percent each), Other Asian and Vietnamese children (2 percent each), and Japanese children (1 percent).

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Of all the Hispanic subgroups, South Americans had the highest percentage of children who were born outside the United States (26 percent). Among Asian subgroups, Koreans had the highest percentage of children born outside the United States (39 percent).

The percentage of children under age 18 who were born outside the United States was lower than the percentage of the total population who were born outside the United States for all Hispanics (11 vs. 44 percent) and Asians (24 vs. 69 percent). There were also differences between the distributions of children outside the United States and the total population outside the United States among some subgroups. A larger proportion of children outside the United States were Mexican (32 percent), compared with the proportion of Mexicans in the total population who were born outside of the United States (28 percent). In contrast, a smaller percentage of Vietnamese children were born outside the United States, compared with the percentage of Vietnamese in the total population who were born outside the United States (1.7 vs. 2.4 percent).

View Table View Table 2c

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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education