Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Minorities
NCES 2010-015
July 2010


Figure 4.

Percentage of children under 18 living in poverty, by living arrangements and race/ethnicity: 2007


Percentage of children under 18 living in poverty, by living arrangements and race/ethnicity: 2007

NOTE: Children are classified by either their parent's marital status or, if no parents are present in the household, by the marital status of the related householder. Poverty information was available for children who were related to the householder. Poverty information was available for children who were related to the householder. Therefore, this table excludes any children who were not related to the householder or who are recorded as the householder or spouse of the householder. To define poverty, the U.S. Census Bureau utilizes a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition. A family, along with each individual in it, is considered poor if the family's total income is less than that family's threshold. The poverty thresholds do not vary geographically and are adjusted annually for inflation using the Consumer Price Index. The official poverty definition counts money income before taxes and does not include capital gains and noncash benefits (such as public housing, Medicaid, and food stamps). Race categories exclude persons of Hispanic ethnicity.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2007.