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Numbers and Rates of Public High School Dropouts: School Year 200405
NCES 2008-305
December 2007

Appendix B: Common Core of Data Glossary

A | B | C | G | H | L | M | N | R | S | U | W

American Indian/Alaska Native
A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition.
Asian/Pacific Islander
A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands. This area includes, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, Thailand, Vietnam, Guam, the Philippine Islands, Samoa, and other Pacific Islands.
Black
A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as Haitian or Negro can be used in addition to Black or African American.
Bureau of Indian Education schools and districts
A school or district that is directly funded by the Bureau of Indian Education (formerly Bureau of Indian Affairs), U.S. Department of the Interior.
Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA)
Each CBSA must contain at least one urban area of 10,000 or more people. Under the Census standards, the county (or counties) in which at least 50 percent of the population resides within urban areas of 10,000 or more people, or that contains at least 5,000 people residing within a single urban area of 10,000 or more people, is identified as a "central county" (or counties). Additional "outlying counties" are included in the CBSA if they meet specified requirements of commuting to or from the central counties. Counties or equivalent entities form the geographic "building blocks" for metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas throughout the United States and Puerto Rico.
General Educational Development (GED) test
A comprehensive test used primarily to appraise the educational development of students who have not completed their formal high school education and who may earn a high school equivalency certificate through achievement of satisfactory scores.

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high school completers
Students who completed the course of public elementary and secondary education offered by the school district and who received a high school diploma, or who met other requirements of completion as defined by state law or policy, during the period October 2004 through September 2005 (for school year 2004–05 completers). Does not include high school equivalency recipients.
Hispanic
A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.
large city
A principal city of a metropolitan CBSA, with the city having a population greater than or equal to 250,000. Prior to 1994–95, "large city" was defined as a principal city of a metropolitan area with a population of 400,000 or more, or a population density of at least 6,000 people per square mile.
large town
An incorporated place or Census-designated place with a population greater than or equal to 25,000 and located outside a metropolitan CBSA or inside a micropolitan CBSA.
local education agencies (LEAs)
Those agencies at the local level whose primary responsibility is to operate public schools or to contract for public school services.
LEA locale code
A code based upon the school locale codes to indicate the location of the district in relation to populous areas. (See also "large city," "midsize city," "urban fringe of a large city," "urban fringe of a midsize city," "large town," "small town," "rural, outside CBSA," and "rural, inside CBSA.") Schools and LEAs located outside the 50 states and District of Columbia are not assigned locale codes.
midsize city
A principal city of a metropolitan CBSA, with the city having a population less than 250,000
Midwest
A geographic region that includes the following states: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

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Northeast
A geographic region that includes the following states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.
rural
Any incorporated place, Census-designated place, or non-place territory not within a metropolitan CBSA or within a micropolitan CBSA and defined as rural by the Census Bureau. From 1998–99 onward, the category was separated into "rural, inside CBSA" and "rural, outside CBSA."
rural, inside CBSA
Any incorporated place, Census-designated place, or non-place territory within a metropolitan CBSA and defined as rural by the Census Bureau. Category represents a subset of "rural," and was introduced in 1998–99.
rural, outside CBSA
Any incorporated place, Census-designated place, or non-place territory not within a metropolitan CBSA or within a micropolitan CBSA and defined as rural by the Census Bureau. Category represents a subset of "rural," and was introduced in 1998–99.
small town
An incorporated place or Census Designated Place (CDP) with a population less than 25,000 and greater than or equal to 2,500 and located outside a metropolitan CBSA or inside a micropolitan CBSA.
South
A geographic region that includes the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
student membership
Annual headcount of students enrolled in school on October 1 or the school day closest to that date. In any given year, some small schools will not have any students.

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ungraded
A class that is not organized on the basis of grade grouping and has no standard grade designation. This includes regular classes that have no grade designations and special classes for exceptional students that have no grade designations. Such a class is likely to contain students of different ages who, frequently, are identified according to level of performance in one or more areas of instruction rather than according to grade level or age level.
urban fringe
A closely settled area, contiguous to a principal city, outside a principal city; with a minimum population of 2,500 inhabitants; with a population density of at least 1,000 per square mile; and with a Census Urbanized Area Code. (See also "LEA locale code.")
urban fringe of a large city
Any incorporated place, Census-designated place, or non-place territory within a metropolitan CBSA of a large city and defined as urban by the Census Bureau. Prior to 1994–95, defined as any incorporated place, Census-designated place, or non-place territory within a CBSA or CSA and defined as urban by the Census Bureau, with a principal city with a population of 400,000 or more, or a population density of at least 6,000 people per square mile. (See also "LEA locale code.")
urban fringe of a midsize city
Any incorporated place, Census-designated place, or non-place territory within a CBSA of a midsize city and defined as urban by the Census Bureau. Prior to 1994–95, defined as any incorporated place, Census-designated place, or non-place territory within a CBSA or CSA and defined as urban by the Census Bureau, with a principal city with a population less than 400,000, or a population density less than 6,000 people per square mile. (See also "LEA locale code.")
West
A geographic region that includes the following states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
White
A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East.

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