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Status and Trends in the Education of American Indians and Alaska Natives
Indicator 4.1 Early Motor and Cognitive Skill Development

Figure 4.1. Percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native children and all children demonstrating specific motor and cognitive skills, by child's age at assessment: 2001
Percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native children and all children demonstrating specific motor and cognitive skills, by child's age at assessment: 2001
# Rounds to zero.
NOTE: The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) is a sample of children who were born between January and December 2001. ECLS-B collected information on children's race by asking parents if their child was White, Black, Asian, Pacific Islander, and/or American Indian/Alaska Native. Parents were asked to choose one or more categories that applied to their child. American Indian/Alaska Native includes those of Hispanic origin and those in combination with one or more other races.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), Restricted-Use File, (NCES 2004-093), 2004.

American Indian/Alaska Native 8- to 22-month-olds demonstrate early motor and cognitive skill development similar to other 8- to 22-month-olds.

The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth cohort (ECLS-B) presents information on young children's specific motor and cognitive skills. Five proficiencies for a young child's early motor skills are demonstrating eye-hand coordination as he/she reaches for objects; sitting alone without assistance; prewalking (taking steps, and supporting his/her weight while standing, with assistance); independent walking (walking without assistance); and balance (can balance in various positions). Five proficiencies for early cognitive skills are demonstrating interest in exploring objects; exploring objects with a purpose; babbling and simple gestures; early problem solving (using reasoning to interact with objects); and communicating with words (both receptively and expressively).

Data for American Indians/Alaska Natives includes those of Hispanic origin and those in combination with one or more other races.

The percentages of American Indian/Alaska Native children, ages 8 to 10 months, were similar to the percentages of all children of the same age in demonstrating eye-hand coordination, sitting, independent walking, and balance. There were also similar percentages of American Indian/Alaska Native and all children 11 to 13 months of age demonstrating eye-hand coordination, sitting, and balance. In addition, most of the 14- to 22-month-old children assessed demonstrated eye-hand coordination, sitting, and prewalking (appendix table A-4.1a).

Most of the children assessed demonstrated exploring objects in play. Similar percentages of American Indian/Alaska Native and all children 8 to 13 months old demonstrated exploring with purpose, babbling, and early problem solving. Five percent of all children 11 to 13 months of age demonstrated using words. Thirty percent of American Indian/Alaska Native 14- to 22-month-olds demonstrated using words (appendix table A-4.1b).


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