Skip Navigation
small NCES header image
Status and Trends in the Education of American Indians and Alaska Natives
Indicator 3.2: Suspension and Expulsion

Figure 3.2. Percentage of public school students in kindergarten through 12th grade who were suspended, by race/ethnicity and sex: 2000
Percentage of public school students in kindergarten through 12th grade who were suspended, by race/ethnicity and sex: 2000
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (OCR), Elementary and Secondary School Survey (E&S), 2000.

American Indian/Alaska Native youth have lower suspension and expulsion rates than Black students, but higher suspension and expulsion rates than students of all other racial/ethnic groups.

Prior research has confirmed the common perception that students who have been suspended from school are at higher risk for other poor school outcomes, including dropping out of school (Wehlage et al. 1989). Students who are disruptive in school or who are not in school may not be fully engaged in active learning. Eight percent of American Indian/ Alaska Native public school students in kindergarten through 12th grade were suspended in 2000. The suspension rate of American Indians/Alaska Natives is higher than that of Whites (5 percent), Hispanics (6 percent), and Asian/Pacific Islanders (3 percent), but is lower than the suspension rate of Blacks (13 percent).

The expulsion rates for all racial/ethnic groups in 2000 are below 1 percent, but American Indian/ Alaska Native students have a rate of expulsion that is second only to Black students.

For all racial/ethnic groups, males have higher rates of suspension and expulsion than females, and comparisons between males and females of different race/ethnicities demonstrate the same trend as the total population. American Indian/Alaska Native males are less likely than Black males to be suspended or expelled, but more likely to be suspended or expelled than White, Hispanic, or Asian/Pacific Islander males. Similarly, American Indian/Alaska Native females are less likely than Black females to be suspended or expelled, but more likely to be suspended or expelled than White, Hispanic, or Asian/Pacific Islander females.

View Table View Table 3.2



Would you like to help us improve our products and website by taking a short survey?

YES, I would like to take the survey

or

No Thanks

The survey consists of a few short questions and takes less than one minute to complete.