Skip Navigation
small NCES header image
Safety in Numbers: Collecting and Using Crime, Violence, and Discipline Incident Data to Make a Difference in Schools
Home/Introduction
Chapter 1
  Using Data to Make a Difference
Chapter 2
    Meeting the Challenges of Data Collection
Chapter 3
    Reporting Incident Data
Chapter 4
    Collecting Data
Conclusions
Endnotes
References
Appendices
PDF File (491 KB)

Contact:
Ghedam Bairu

(202) 502-7304

References


Banks, R. (2000). Bullying in schools. ERIC Review, 7(1).

Bernhardt, V.L. (1998). Data analysis for comprehensive schoolwide improvement. Larchmont, NY: Eye on Education.

Brown, C. (2000). How states and systems use data. Fairfield, AL: Fairfield Board of Education. (Unpublished).

Byrd, R. S. and Weitzman, M. L. (1994). Predictors of Early Grade Retention Among Children in the United States. Pediatrics, 93 (3), 81-87.

California Department of Education. (2001). California safe schools assessment: communications and media relations workshop. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education.

California Department of Education. (1997). Challenge toolkit: Safe and healthy schools. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education.

California Department of Education and the Crime and Violence Prevention Center. (1995). Safe schools: A planning guide for action. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education.

Clay, D. (1996). School safety and discipline. Cleveland, OH: Cleveland State University.

Colorado Trust. (2000). Supporting schools initiative. Denver, CO: Colorado Trust.

Cornell, D.G., Loper, A.B., Atkinson, A.J., and Sheras, P.L. (1999). Youth violence prevention in Virginia: A needs assessment. Charlottesville, VA: Virginia Youth Violence Prevention Project.

Davis, C., Hammond, C., and Benson, D. (2000). Florida SESIR Regional Workshop Training Materials. Tallahassee, FL: Florida Safe Learning Environment Institute at the Florida A & M University and the Florida Department of Education.

Dwyer, K., Osher, D., and Warger, C. (1998). Early warning, timely response: A guide to safe schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.

Edmonds, R. (1979). A discussion of the literature and issues related to effective schooling. St. Louis, MO.: CEMREL.

Flannery, D. (1998). Improving school violence prevention programs through meaningful evaluation. ERIC Digest, 132.

Gaskins, B. (1999). How to make a difference through site-based school public relations planning. In K.K. Muir (Ed.), School public relations: Building confidence in education. Rockville, MD: National School Public Relations Association.

Gottfredson, D.C., Wilson, D.B., and Najaka, S.S. (2001). School-based crime prevention. In D.P. Farrington, L.W. Sherman and B. Welsh (Eds.), Evidence-based crime prevention. London, UK: Harwood Academic Publishers.

Gottfredson, DC (1997). School-based crime prevention. In L. Sherman, DC Gottfredson, D. MacKenzie, J. Eck, P. Reuter, and S. Bushway (Eds.), Preventing crime: What works, what doesn't, what's promising: A report to the United States Congress Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice.

Hinshaw, S. P. (1992). Academic underachievement, attention deficits, and aggression: Comorbidity and implications for intervention. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 60 (6), 893-903.

Holcomb, E.L. (1998). Getting excited about data: How to combine people, passion, and proof. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc.

Johnson, J.H. (1996). Data-driven school improvement. Oregon School Study Council, 39(5).

Kame'enui, E.J., And Simmons, DC (1998). Beyond effective practices to schools as host environments: Building and sustaining a school-wide intervention model in reading. OSSC Bulletin, 41(3), 3-24.

Kaminski, R.A., And Good, R.H., III (1996). Toward a technology for assessing basic early literacy skills. School Psychology Review, 25,215-227.

Kinder, J.A. (2000). A short guide to school public relations. Phi Delta Kappa Fastbacks, 464, 7-44.

Lezotte, L.W. (1991). Correlates of effective schools: The first and second generation. Okemos, MI: Effective Schools Products, Ltd.

Linquanti, R., and Berliner, B. (1994). Rebuilding schools as safe havens: A typology for selecting and integrating violence prevention strategies. Portland, OR: Western Regional Center for Drug-Free Schools and Communities.

Muir, K.K. (Ed.) (1999). School public relations: Building confidence in education. Rockville, MD: National School Public Relations Association.

Nakasato, J. (2000). Data-based decisionmaking in Hawaii's behavior support effort. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, 2(4).

National Center for Education Statistics (2001). Digest of Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.

Nelson, R.J., Martella, R.M., And Marchand-Martella, N. (In press). Maximizing student learning: The effects of a comprehensive school-based program for preventing problem behavior. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.

Pennsylvania Department of Education (2001). Ridge awards nearly 9 million in safe-school grants. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Education.

Pepperl, J.C. And Lezotte, L.W. (1999). What the effective schools research says: Safe and orderly environment. Okemos, MI: Effective Schools Products, Ltd.

Price, J. (1999). Customer service. In K.K. Muir (Ed.), School public relations: Building confidence in education. Rockville, MD: National School Public Relations Association.

Riley, P., and McDaniel, J. (1998). Safe school plans begin with information gathering. School Administrator, 8(55).

Ross, V.M. (1999). Internal Communication: PR Training. In K.K. Muir (Ed.), School public relations: Building confidence in education. Rockville, MD: National School Public Relations Association.

Sack, J.L. (1999). An ounce of prevention. Education Week, 19(9).

Safe, Disciplined, and Drug-Free Schools Project (2000). Developing schoolwide discipline plans. Safe, Disciplined and Drug-Free Schools Notes, 3 (3).

Shinn, M. (1997). Instructional decisionmaking using curriculum-based measurement. Unpublished workshop materials.

Sprague, J., Sugai, G., Horner, R., and Walker, H.M. (1999). Using office discipline referral data to evaluate schoolwide discipline and violence prevention interventions. Oregon School Study Council Bulletin, 42(2).

Squires, D.A., Huitt, W.G., And Segars, J.K. (1983). Effective schools and classrooms: A research-based perspective. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Stephens, R. (1994). Planning for safer and better schools: School violence prevention and intervention strategies. School Psychology Review, 23(2).

Stephens, R.D. (2000). Safe School Planning. In Elliot, D.S., Hamburg, B.A., and Williams, K.R. (Eds.) Violence in American schools. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Sugai, G., Sprague, J.R., Horner, R.H. And Walker, H.M. (2000). Preventing school violence: The use of office discipline referrals to assess and monitor schoolwide discipline interventions. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 8(2).

Sugai, G.M., Kame'enui, E.J., Horner, R.H., And Simmons, DC (1998). Effective instructional and behavioral support systems: A schoolwide approach to discipline and early literacy. Eugene, OR: University of Oregon.

Uniform Crime Reporting Program. (2000). National incident-based report system, volume 1: Data collection guidelines. Washington, DC: Criminal Justice Information Services Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice.

Valle-Greene, A. (2000). Schools Tackle Discipline in Classrooms. Lakeland Ledger, May 21, 2000.

Yoshikawa, H. (1995). Long-term effects of early childhood programs on social outcomes and delinquency. Future of Children, 5 (3), 51-75.



Would you like to help us improve our products and website by taking a short survey?

YES, I would like to take the survey

or

No Thanks

The survey consists of a few short questions and takes less than one minute to complete.
National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education