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Safety in Numbers: Collecting and Using Crime, Violence, and Discipline Incident Data to Make a Difference in Schools
Home/Introduction
Chapter 1
  Using Data to Make a Difference
Chapter 2
    Meeting the Challenges of Data Collection
Chapter 3
    Reporting Incident Data
Chapter 4
    Collecting Data
Conclusions
Endnotes
References
Appendices
PDF File (491 KB)

Contact:
Ghedam Bairu

(202) 502-7304

Footnotes


1 This funding category has been eliminated from the Safe and Drug-Free Schools Legislation (see No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, the reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act).

2 Federal reporting requirements are described in appendix A.

3 Stating clear expectations for student behavior to parents, students, and staff in more than just the handbooks will likely be necessary to maximize appropriate behavior. Recommendations for how to teach appropriate behavior are beyond the scope of this report.

4 Note: Distributing a staff handbook that includes information on infractions and their definitions should be considered a component of staff training, not a substitute.

5 Readers are reminded that the National Center for Education Statistics' Student and Staff Data Handbooks contain definitions and codes for data elements for a variety of demographic characteristics including race/ethnicity, gender, limited-English proficiency, students served under Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act Public Law 105-17 (IDEA), and students served under Section 504. These and other descriptive items are necessary for completion of a variety of state and Federal reporting requirements. If a traditional or independent incident database is employed rather than a relational database, in addition to the variables discussed in this chapter, codes for the above characteristics will need to be included so that users can respond to state and Federal mandates.

6 It is important to maintain these data files for the length of time mandated by state and local jurisdictions.

7 Refer to the National Center for Education Statistics' Student Data Handbook for Elementary, Secondary, and Early Childhood Education for additional recommendations on constructing identifiers.

8 Refer to the National Center for Education Statistics' Student Data Handbook for Elementary, Secondary, and Early Childhood Education for additional recommendations on assigning school numbers.

9 Refer to the National Forum on Education Statistics' Education Facilities Handbook (in press) for additional recommendations on developing codes to identify facilities data.

10 Refer to the National Center for Education Statistics' handbook Financial Accounting for Local and State School Systems for additional recommendations on developing codes to capture the cost of losses.

11 Refer to the National Center for Education Statistics' Student Data Handbook for Elementary, Secondary, and Early Childhood Education and Staff Data Handbook for Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education for additional recommendations on constructing identifiers.

12 The Gun-Free Schools Act (GFSA) requires that each state receiving Federal funds under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) have a state law that requires all local educational agencies (LEAs) in the state to expel from school for at least 1 year any student found bringing a firearm to school. It also requires that state laws authorize the LEA chief administering officer to modify any such expulsion on a case-by-case basis. In addition, the GFSA states that it must be construed so as to be consistent with the IDEA.

13 As of January 2002, the U.S. Department of Education's (ED's) Office of Special Education Programs differentiates between knives with blades 2.5 inches or longer and blades less than 2.5 inches when collecting information on incidents involving students with disabilities.

14 Ed's Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools Program collects information on incidents involving knives with blades 3 inches or longer. See appendix A for additional information regarding Federal reporting requirements.

15 Drugs include illegal substances such as marijuana and cocaine and unauthorized use of controlled substances such as demerol and morphine. Consult local and state laws for a complete list of these substances.

16 Consult local and state laws for a complete list of these substances.

17 Safe and Drug-Free Schools Program (SDFS) reporting requires that Motor Vehicle Theft be reported separately from other Theft. Thus, administrators may want to consider using multiple categories of theft to save time when completing SDFS reporting requirements. See Appendix A.

18 Readers are reminded that the National Center for Education Statistics' Student and Staff Data Handbooks contain definitions and codes for data elements for a variety of demographic characteristics including race/ethnicity, gender, limited-English proficiency, students served under IDEA, and students served under Section 504. These and other descriptive items are necessary for completion of a variety of state and Federal reporting requirements. As noted in section 4.1, if a traditional or independent incident database is employed rather than a relational database, in addition to the variables discussed in this section, codes for the above characteristics will need to be included so that users can respond to state and Federal mandates.

19 Refer to the National Center for Education Statistics' Student Data Handbook for Elementary, Secondary, and Early Childhood Education and Staff Data Handbook for Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education for additional recommendations on constructing identifiers.

20 Readers are reminded that the National Center for Education Statistics' Student and Staff Data Handbooks contain definitions and codes for data elements for a variety of demographic characteristics including race/ethnicity, gender, limited-English proficiency, students served under IDEA, and students served under Section 504. These and other descriptive items are necessary for completion of a variety of state and Federal reporting requirements. As noted in section 4.1, if a traditional or independent incident database is employed rather than a relational database, in addition to the variables discussed in this section, codes for the above characteristics will need to be included so that users can respond to state and Federal mandates.

21 Refer to the National Center for Education Statistics' Student Data Handbook for Elementary, Secondary, and Early Childhood Education and Staff Data Handbook for Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education for additional recommendations on constructing identifiers.

22 Record disciplinary actions taken against school staff in the staff database or in a location specified by district or state guidelines. Recommendations for codes to capture that information are beyond the scope of this report.

23 When a change of placement is prescribed for a special education student, IDEA requires that the student's Individual Educational Planning Team meet.

24 When a change of placement is prescribed for a special education student, IDEA requires that the student's Individual Educational Planning Team meet.

25 When a change of placement is prescribed for a special education student, IDEA requires that the student's Individual Educational Planning Team meet.

26 See state and local regulations for violations covered by these policies.

27 See state and local regulations for violations covered by these policies.


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