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Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 2001
Executive Summary

Foreword

Acknowledgments

Violent Deaths at School

Nonfatal Student Victimization-Student Reports

Violence and Crime at School-Public School Principal/ Disciplinarian Reports

-Crimes reported to the police

-Specific crimes reported to the police

Nonfatal Teacher Victimization at School-Teacher Reports

School Environment

Figures

Full Report (PDF)

-Supplemental Tables (PDF - 145 KB)

-Standard Error Tables (PDF - 144 KB)

-Appendix A   School Practices and Policies Related to Safety and Discipline' (PDF - 52 KB)

-Appendix B   Technical Notes (PDF - 73 KB)

-Appendix C   Glossary of Terms (PDF - 25 KB)

-Excel Tables   Zip Format (307 KB)

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Violence and Crime at School-Public School Principal/ Disciplinarian Reports

7. Crimes reported to the police*

The number of crimes that principals indicated they reported to police or other law enforcement representatives is a useful measure of the occurrences of serious crimes in the nation's schools. The percentage of schools reporting crimes provides an indication of how widespread crime is, while the number of crimes reported provides information on the magnitude of the problem.

  • In 1996-97, 10 percent of all public schools reported at least one serious violent crime to a law enforcement representative (figure 7.1 and table 7.1). Another 47 percent of public schools reported a less serious violent or nonviolent crime (but not a serious violent one). The remaining 43 percent of public schools did not report any of these crimes to the police.
  • The vast majority of crimes reported by public schools were of the less serious violent or nonviolent type in 1996-97 (402,000 out of the 424,000 total crimes reported to the police) (table 7.3).
  • The percentage of schools reporting crimes was similar at the middle and high school levels (figure 7.2 and table 7.1). At each level, about 20 percent of the schools reported at least one serious violent crime, and about 55 percent reported at least one less serious violent or nonviolent crime, but no serious violent crime in 1996-97.
  • The numbers of reported incidents per 1,000 students were similar for middle and high schools for both serious violent and less serious violent and nonviolent crimes (figure 7.2 and table 7.4). For both types of crimes, there was a lower rate at the elementary level than at the middle or high school levels.
  • The percentage of schools reporting at least one serious violent crime was much higher in cities (17 percent) than in towns (5 percent) or rural areas (8 percent) during 1996-97 (figure 7.2 and table 7.1).
*This indicator repeats information from the 2000 Indicators of School Crime and Safety report.

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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education