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Private Schools in the United States: A Statistical Profile, 1993-94 / Characteristics of Teachers and Principals

Characteristics of Teachers and Principals


Highlights for Characteristics of Teachers and Principals

  • In 1993-94, 378,365 teachers taught in private schools, nearly one-eighth of all elementary and secondary teachers in the country. Two in 10 private school teachers were part-time, and there were 2 "other" staff for every 3 teachers (table 3.1).

  • The numbers of special education teachers and vocational education teachers employed in typical private shools are relatively small, but the numbers of foreign language teachers are relatively high at both elemen tary and secondary levels, compared to public schools (table 3.2).

  • The objective qualifications of private school teachers and principals, on average, are less than those of public school teachers and principals.

    • About 30 percent of private school teachers are not state certified in the field of their main assignment, compared to 3 percent of public school teachers (table 3.3).

    • More than 6 percent of private school teachers do not have a bache lors degree, compared to fewer than 1 percent of public school teach ers; and 34 percent have at least a masters degree, compared to 47 percent of public school teachers (table 3.4).

    • About one in four private school principals has no degree beyond a bachelor's degree, compared to 1.4 percent of public school principals (table 3.9).

  • More principals and teachers in private schools are under 40 years of age than their public school counterparts (tables 3.5 and 3.8).

  • Private school teachers earn base salaries, on average, less than two-thirds of average public school teachers' salaries; and principals earn slightly more than half of their public school counterparts' salaries (tables 3.7 and 3.12). Private school teachers, on the other hand, are more likely to receive in-kind compensation: 15 percent receive tuition waivers for their children, 20.2 percent receive free meals, and 7 percent receive housing support (table 3.13). Such in-kind compensation is rarely available to public school teachers.

  • On measures of job satisfaction, private school teachers are more satis fied than public school teachers (table 3.12). They feel that they gener ally have more influence on school discipline and curriculum policies and more control over their classroom textbooks, content, techniques, grading, and discipline (table 3.11).

List of Tables: Characteristics of Teachers and Principles

Table 3.1: Number of teachers, of full-time equivalent (FTE) teachers, of other staff, and percentage full time as reported by schools, by affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.2a: Percentage distribution of grades K-6 teachers, by main field of assignment and affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.2b: Percentage distribution of grades 7-12 teachers, by main field of assignment and affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.3: Percentage of teachers certified, by affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.4: Percentage of teachers with different highest degree obtained and affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.5: Percentage of teachers in different age ranges, by affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.6: Percentage of teachers of different sex, race, and ethnicity, by affiliation: 1993- 94

Table 3.7: Principals' experience in teaching and administering, and salary, by affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.8: Percentage of principals in different age ranges, by affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.9: Percentage of principals by different highest degree obtained and affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.10: Percentage of principals of different sex, race, and ethnicity, by affiliation: 1993- 94

Table 3.11; Average teacher ratings on policy and control over teaching practices, by affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.12:Teachers' average salaries and satisfaction ratings, by affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.13: Percentage of teachers reporting different in-kind benefits, by affiliation: 1993- 94

Table 3.14: Teachers who were newly hired or were laid off, as a percentage of all current teachers, by affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.15: Average difficulty filling vacancies in each field of teaching, by affiliation: 1993-94

Table 3.16: Mean percentage of schools using different strategies to address unfilled vacancies, by affiliation: 1993-94


Characteristics of StudentsCharacteristics of Students  Table 3.1
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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education