Skip Navigation
small NCES header image
Youth Indicators, 2005: Trends in the Well-Being of American Youth

Indicator 46: Weight Control and Dieting

Figure 46. Percentage of high school students who reported selected weight control and dieting characteristics, by sex and race/ethnicity: 2003

Percentage of high school students who reported selected weight control and dieting characteristics, by sex and race/ethnicity: 2003
1Students who were in the 95th or higher percentile for body mass index, by age and sex, based on reference data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I. Percentiles for each age level, from 2 to 20 years of age, are based on weight and height, and differ for each age level. The percentage of overweight high school students is calculated from the total number of students in the 95th percentile or higher for their age group across all high school age groups.
2Students who were in the 85th or higher percentile, but less than the 95th percentile for body mass index, by age and sex, based on reference data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I are considered at risk for becoming overweight.
NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance-United States, 2003.

In 2003, 27 percent of high school students were overweight or at risk for becoming overweight. Although a higher percentage of males (16 percent) than females (8 percent) were overweight, females were twice as likely to be attempting weight loss (59 vs. 29 percent). Black high school students were more likely to be overweight than their White classmates (16 vs. 10 percent), as well as more likely to be at risk for becoming overweight (18 percent) compared to their White peers (13 percent). There were no measurable differences in the percentage of Black and Hispanic students who were overweight or at risk for becoming overweight. However, Black students were less likely to report believing they were overweight (22 percent) compared to White (31 percent) and Hispanic students (32 percent).


View Table View Table

Would you like to help us improve our products and website by taking a short survey?

YES, I would like to take the survey

or

No Thanks

The survey consists of a few short questions and takes less than one minute to complete.