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2007 Summer Data Conference Longitudinal Data Systems Strand

Summary
Presentations

Summary:

The Longitudinal Data Systems (LDS) strand at the 2007 NCES Summer Data Conference (STATS-DC 2007) in Washington, DC, included presentations from a number of SLDS Grant Program recipient states (Alaska, Florida, Maryland, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Tennessee), as well as from 3 districts located in those states (Poway Unified School District, California; Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit 13, Pennsylvania; DuBois Area School District, Pennsylvania). Topics included: data quality; effective data and systems governance; stakeholder engagement and input into the design and development of statewide longitudinal data systems; linking education data systems with other administrative databases; effective use of formative assessments and longitudinal growth measures to improve student achievement at the local level; and updates on work completed to date on SLDS grant projects.


Presentations


Session I

Lessons Learned From Building a State Longitudinal Data Warehouse

  Kathy Long, Alaska Department of Education and Early Development
Sidney Fadaoff, Alaska Department of Education and Early Development
 

Are you ready to build a State Longitudinal Data Warehouse? The Alaska Department of Education and Early Development received a Longitudinal Data Grant in November of 2005. This presentation outlines the challenges a state may face as it builds a data warehouse. Building a data warehouse is analogous to remodeling a local grocery store—the project never goes as planned: adjustments to the project plan and budget are constant; the quality of data items is scrutinized; the questioning of data quality and moving of data items frustrates data consumers and they leave the store; and the structure of the data store changes and it takes longer to shop. This session expands on the challenges you may face when you remodel your data store and how you might be able to avoid some of the pitfalls.

Download Zipped PowerPoint Presentation:
Stakeholder Introduction and Background Presentation Zip File (4.76 MB)
Lessons Learned From Building a State Longitudinal Data
Warehouse
Zip File (243 KB)

 

Session II Don't Get Lost in Translation—LDS and the Data Divas, Geeks, and Duffers (i.e., the Stakeholders): Strategies for Success
  Debra Holdren (for Ellen Still) South Carolina Department of Education
 

Longitudinal Data Systems (LDS) are about making data meaningful and useful to everyone involved in education. However, to a surprising degree, the various user “communities” within and around education do not speak the same language. To be successful, an LDS project must find ways to articulate its goals to and decipher the needs of the various stakeholder groups, so that all users are involved and on board. This presentation has been developed by South Carolina's former Deputy Superintendent for Policy, Research, and Technology to describe the state's current approach to engaging stakeholders and translating their messages for optimizing outcomes

Download Zipped PowerPoint Presentation:
Don't Get Lost in Translation—LDS and the Data Divas, Geeks, and Duffers Zip File (859 KB)

 

Session III 3...2...1...PIMS! Pennsylvania's Liftoff to a Longitudinal Data System
  Sharon Clark, Pennsylvania Department of Education
Dave Ream, Pennsylvania Department of Education
 

PIMS, or the Pennsylvania Information Management System, is an initiative designed to make the collection and use of longitudinal student data in Pennsylvania a reality. Learn about Pennsylvania's process and approach as it prepares for the liftoff of PIMS in the 2007/08 school year. Topics include overall vision, early successes, challenges encountered, importance of governance, lessons learned on how to be better prepared to undertake such an initiative, and PIMS' plans for the 2007/08 school year and beyond.

Download Zipped PowerPoint Presentation:
3…2…1…PIMS! Pennsylvania's Liftoff to a Longitudinal Data
System
Zip File (4.81 MB)

 

Session IV Using Formative Assessments and Longitudinal Growth Measures to Improve Student Learning
  Ray Wilson, Poway Unified School District, California
Raymond Yeagley, Northwest Evaluation Association
 

Student academic growth is recognized increasingly as an important measure of school effectiveness. What are some of the differences and similarities in growth and value added measures and how can they extend beyond accountability to support the improvement of curriculum and instruction and, ultimately, result in increased student learning? The Executive Director of Assessment and Accountability of the Poway Unified School District shows how the district and its schools developed a strategic plan and used formative assessment and longitudinal student data, including growth analyses, to effectively improve student outcomes. He discusses how data became a powerful tool in the hands of teachers, administrators, and especially students, and resulted on significant and sustained improvement in student achievement at all performance levels.

Download Zipped PowerPoint Presentation & Word & PDF Handouts:
Using Formative Assessments and Longitudinal Growth Measures to Improve Student Learning Zip File (481 KB)

View Video:
Session IV Flash (128 MB)

 

Session V South Carolina's Multi-Agency Integrated Data Warehouse and Its Role in Support of Education
  David Patterson, South Carolina Office of Research and Statistics
 

This presentation focuses on the role of integrated data systems in support of education in terms of operational needs and research/business intelligence. An overview of South Carolina's multi-agency data warehouse housed at the Office of Research and Statistics (ORS) is provided and followed by a more specific discussion of the partnership between the South Carolina Department of Education and ORS in the creation of a longitudinal data system designed to make education data available to users ranging from teachers to education researchers and decision makers.

Download Zipped PowerPoint Presentation:
South Carolina's Multi-Agency Integrated Data Warehouse and Its Role in Support of Education Zip File (3.67 MB)

View Video:
Session V Flash (130 MB)

 

Session VI Developing an Integrated Data System—Options: Their Pros and Cons
Jeff Sellers, Florida Department of Education
Andre Smith, Florida Department of Education

This session presents options to the development of an integrated data system. Several models are presented along with the benefits and limitations of each. These include subjects related to cost, functionality, and supportability. The integration of data focuses on different types of education data, but also includes data related to employment, public assistance, foster care, military, and corrections. If your state is considering the development of an integrated data system, or you have an established system and want ideas to enhance or increase its current capabilities, this presentation is for you.

Download Zipped PowerPoint Presentation:
Developing an Integrated Data System Zip File (269 KB)

View Video:
Session VI Flash (103 MB)

 

Session VII Demystifying the Messy, Messy, Messy World of Longitudinal Analyses of Student Achievement Test Scores: What to Assume and NOT!
  Kristen Lewald and Jim Bohan, Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit 13, Pennsylvania
Dan Long, Tennessee Department of Education
June Rivers, SAS Institute

With the advent of No Child Left Behind, all states have sufficient data for longitudinal analyses, following the progress of individual students over time. But the measures available are not always pristine! Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit 13 shares the business rules it requires SAS to incorporate to ensure that the information the state receives from longitudinal analyses has sufficient reliability to be useful to educators at the state, district, and building level. The session concludes with a discussion of the basic data elements necessary to deliver longitudinal analyses of teaching effectiveness in Tennessee.

Download Zipped PowerPoint Presentation:
Demystifying the Messy, Messy, Messy World of Longitudinal Analyses of Student Achievement Test Scores Zip File (395 KB)

View Video:
Session VII Flash (140 MB)

 

Session VIII Seeing the Forest and the Trees: Using Longitudinal Data Analyses to Achieve Award Winning Results
Sharon Kirk, DuBois Area School District, Pennsylvania

This presentation documents the journey of a low-income, rural school district as it used longitudinal data analyses to increase student achievement and become award winning (the DuBois Area School District and its schools have received numerous national and local awards for student outcomes in the last few years). The District's Superintendent explains how the Pennsylvania Value Added Assessment System was used effectively by teachers as a self assessment tool, by principals to develop achievement plans, and by administrators to identify district strengths and weaknesses. The presenter also discusses how, as a result, effective changes were made in curriculum, instruction, and professional development framework and how students benefited most of all.

Download Zipped PowerPoint Presentation:
Practical Application of Value-Added Growth Model Zip File (4.20 MB)

View Video:
Session VIII Flash (132 MB)

 

Session IX Managing and Leveraging Research Resources to Improve Student Outcomes
Leslie Wilson, Maryland State Department of Education
Andre Smith, Florida Department of Education

The University of Maryland's Department of Measurement Statistics and Evaluation has teamed up with the Maryland State Department of Education to provide research support to the state and local school systems. A variety of models are shared to help states and local systems expand their capacity to conduct research and collaborate to improve instruction and student learning.

The Florida Department of Education's Division of Accountability, Research, and Measurement has developed an internal process for managing and leveraging internal and external data requests. This presentation explains the data request process, how external data requests are handled within it, and how Florida benefits from the results.

Download Zipped PowerPoint Presentations:
A Model for Research Support for States and Local School Systems–Leslie Wilson Zip File (9 KB)
2007 National Center for Education Statistics Conference–Andre
Smith
Zip File (96 KB)

View Video:
Session IX Flash (102 MB)

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