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Education Statistics Quarterly
Vol 3, Issue 3, Topic: Postsecondary Education
National Postsecondary Student Aid Study: Student Financial Aid Estimates for 1999–2000
By: Andrew G. Malizio
 
This article was originally published as the Introduction and Highlights of the E.D. Tabs report of the same name. The sample survey data are from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS).
 
 

The National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS) is a comprehensive survey that examines how students and their families pay for postsecondary education. The study includes nationally representative samples of undergraduate, graduate, and first-professional students; students attending less-than-2-year, 2-year, 4-year, and doctorate-granting institutions; and students who receive financial aid and those who do not receive aid.

This report has been prepared to provide some key estimates as policymakers, researchers, and analysts begin working on research for the next reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. It is based on information from about 50,000 undergraduates, 11,000 graduate students, and 1,000 first-professional students enrolled at approximately 1,000 postsecondary institutions during the 1999–2000 academic year. The sample represents about 16.5 million undergraduates, 2.3 million graduate students, and 330,000 first-professional students enrolled at any time between July 1, 1999, and June 30, 2000. Considerably more detail on how students finance their postsecondary education and student background characteristics will be published in subsequent reports.

Estimates in this report focus primarily on percentages of students receiving specified types of financial aid, and average amounts of specific types of financial aid received. Unless otherwise noted, all average amounts of financial aid described here and presented in the tables reflect the weighted means and are based only on the recipients of the specified types of aid. Highlights are presented separately for undergraduates and graduate and firstprofessional students.

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  • Among the 16.5 million undergraduates (including fulltime and parttime students) enrolled during 1999–2000, 55 percent (about 9.2 million) received some type of financial aid, averaging $6,206.
  • Among aided undergraduates, 40 percent received grants only; 13 percent received loans only; 26 per-cent received grants and loans; 8 percent received grants, loans, and work-study; and the remaining 13 percent received other combinations of aid.
Federal aid to undergraduates
  • Overall, about two out of five undergraduates (39 percent) received some type of federal aid, averaging about $5,230 (tables A and B).
  • Percentages of undergraduates receiving federal aid varied depending on family income and type of institution. Among dependent students, percentages receiving federal aid ranged from 70 percent of undergraduates from families with incomes of less than $20,000 to about 25 percent of undergraduates from families with incomes of $100,000 or more. Among independent students, 66 percent of those with incomes less than $10,000 received some federal financial aid (table A).
  • Percentages of undergraduates receiving federal aid ranged from 21 percent at public 2-year institutions to 80 percent at private for-profit institutions.
Institutional aid to undergraduates
  • Forty-seven percent of undergraduates at private not-for-profit 4-year institutions received some institutional aid, averaging about $6,760 (tables A and B).
Title IV aid to undergraduates
  • About one of every eight dependent undergraduates (13 percent) came from families with incomes less than $20,000. Among Title IV aid recipients who were dependent on their parents for financial support, 21 percent had family incomes less than $20,000. Three of every eight independent undergraduates (38 percent) who received Title IV aid had family incomes less than $10,000.
  • Among undergraduates enrolled full time for the full year at one institution, about 30 percent received a federal Pell grant, averaging $2,314.
  • Nearly one of every four undergraduates (23 percent) received a federally subsidized Stafford loan, averaging about $3,214.
  • Among the Title IV loan recipients enrolled in private notforprofit doctorategranting institutions, the average loan amount was $5,161. At private not-for-profit non-doctorate-granting 4-year institutions, the average received was $5,095.
  • Among the Title IV loan recipients enrolled in public doctorategranting institutions, the average student loan amount was $4,743. At public non-doctorate-granting 4-year institutions, the average received was $4,225.
  • Fifty-four percent of students enrolled in private forprofit less-than-2-year institutions received a Title IV loan; the average received was $4,879.
  • Among full-time, full-year undergraduates, about 40 percent of those at public 2-year institutions, 56 percent of those at public 4-year institutions, and 67 percent of those at private not-for-profit 4-year institutions received some Title IV financial aid.
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  • Among the 2.7 million graduate and first-professional students (including fulltime and parttime students) enrolled during 1999–2000, about 6 of every 10 students received some financial aid, averaging $13,255. Eight of every 10 full-time, full-year students (82 percent) received some type of financial aid, averaging almost $19,600. First-professional students received an average of about $21,500 (tables C and D).
Stafford loans to graduate and first-professional students
  • Overall, 29 percent of graduate and first-professional students received Stafford loans, averaging nearly $12,850. Average amounts borrowed varied considerably by degree program. About 73 percent of first-professional students took out Stafford loans, compared to 26 percent of master's degree students and 21 percent of doctoral students.
Institutional aid to graduate and first-professional students
  • Overall, 27 percent of graduate and first-professional students received some institutional aid, averaging about $9,840, but this varied considerably depending on the type of program. For example, 22 percent of students in master's degree programs compared to 58 percent of students in doctoral degree programs received some institutional aid.
Employer aid to graduate and firstprofessional students
  • About one in four master's degree students received employer aid, averaging about $3,840. About 11 percent of doctoral students and 5 percent of first-professional students received employer aid.
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Table A.—Percentage of undergraduates receiving selected types of federal, institutional, or state aid: 1999–2000
Table A.- Percentage of undergraduates receiving selected types of federal, institutional, or state aid: 1999-2000

†Not applicable.

NOTE: Students can receive more than one type of aid. Estimates by tuition and fees categories, institution type, and attendance pattern exclude students who attended multiple institutions.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 1999–2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000). (Originally published as table 3 on p. 8 of the complete report from which this article is excerpted.) Table revised October 2001.

Table B.—Average amounts of selected types of federal, institutional, or state aid received by undergraduates: 1999–2000
Table B.- Average amounts of selected types of federal, institutional, or state aid received by undergraduates: 1999-2000

#Too small to report.

†Not applicable.

NOTE: Average amounts shown above are for recipients of the specified aid. Students can receive more than one type of aid. Estimates by tuition and fees categories, institution type, and attendance pattern exclude students who attended multiple institutions.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 1999–2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000). (Originally published as table 4 on p. 9 of the complete report from which this article is excerpted.) Table revised October 2001.

Table C.—Percentage of graduate and first-professional students receiving selected types of financial aid: 1999–2000
Table C.- Percentage of graduate and first-professional students receiving selected types of financial aid: 1999-2000

NOTE: "Any aid" includes all types of financial aid except aid from parents, friends, and relatives. Students can receive more than one type of aid. Although assistantships may include federal, state, or institutional dollars, all assistantships are counted both as "institutional aid" and as assistantships. NCES defines first-professional programs to include the following fields of study: dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathic medicine, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, podiatric medicine, chiropractic, law, and theological professions. Private master's, doctoral, and first-professional programs are private not-for-profit. All for-profit programs are included under "other program." Estimates by type of graduate program, institution control, and attendance pattern exclude students who attended multiple institutions.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 1999–2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000). (Originally published as table 13 on p. 20 of the complete report from which this article is excerpted.) Table revised October 2001.

Table D.—Average amounts of selected types of aid received by graduate and first–professional students: 1999–2000
Table D.- Average amounts of selected types of aid received by graduate and first-professional students: 1999-2000

#Too small to report.

NOTE: Average amounts shown above are for recipients of the specified aid. "Any aid" includes all types of financial aid except aid from parents, friends, and relatives. Students can receive more than one type of aid. Although assistantships may include federal, state, or institutional dollars, all assistantships are counted both as "institutional aid" and as assistantships. NCES defines first-professional programs to include the following fields of study: dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathic medicine, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, podiatric medicine, chiropractic, law, and theological professions. Private master's, doctoral, and first-professional programs are private not-for-profit. All for-profit programs are included under "other program." Estimates by type of graduate program, institution control, and attendance pattern exclude students who attended multiple institutions.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 1999–2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000). (Originally published as table 14 on p. 21 of the complete report from which this article is excerpted.) Table revised October 2001.

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Data source:The NCES 1999–2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000).

For technical information, see the complete report:

Malizio, A.G. (2001). National Postsecondary Student Aid Study: Student Financial Aid Estimates for 1999–2000 (NCES 2001-209).

Author affiliation: A.G. Malizio, NCES.

For questions about content, contact Aurora D'Amico (aurora.d'amico@ed.gov) or Andrew G. Malizio (andrew.malizio@ed.gov).

To obtain the complete report (NCES 2001-209), visit the NCES Web Site (http://nces.ed.gov).


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