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PEDAR: Executive Summary  Gender Differences in Participation and Completion of Undergraduate Education and How They Have Changed Over Time
Introduction
Trends in Postsecondary Enrollment and Degree Awards
Changes in Undergraduate Student Profiles and Enrollment Characteristics
Preparation, Persistence, and Progress Through Undergraduate Education
High School Academic Preparation and Subsequent Attainment
Postsecondary Persistence and Degree Completion
Early Labor Market Outcomes Among Bachelor's Degree Recipients
Conclusions
Research Methodology
References
Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
 Preparation, Persistence, and Progress Through Undergraduate Education - Postsecondary Persistence and Degree Completion

Comparing students who first began their postsecondary education in 1989–90 with those who first enrolled 6 years later in 1995–96, Horn and Berger (2004) found that roughly two-thirds of students in both cohorts had either completed a postsecondary credential or were still enrolled 5 years after beginning college. The overall degree completion rate was lower for the 1995–96 cohort than for their 1989–90 counterparts, but there was an increase in the percentage of students who had not yet completed a degree but were still enrolled in a 4-year institution 5 years after they had begun. Among 1989–90 beginning students, 65 percent of women had completed a degree or certificate or were still enrolled 5 years later, compared with 62 percent of men (table 12). Among 1995–96 beginning students, women were more likely than men to complete a degree or certificate within 5 years (49 vs. 44 percent). However, when students who were still enrolled after 5 years were included in the outcome, no difference could be detected between men and women (64 and 65 percent, respectively, had completed a degree or were still enrolled), suggesting that men in the second cohort may be taking longer than women in their effort to complete a degree.

 


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education