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PEDAR: Executive Summary What Students Pay for College: Changes in Net Price of College Attendance Between 1992-93 and 1999-2000
Introduction
Changes in Financial Aid Awards Between 1992-93 and 1999-2000
Data Analyzed in This Study
Measures of Net Tuition and Net Price
Changes in Net Tuition and Net Price
Public 4-Year Colleges and Universities
Public 4-Year Colleges and Universities: Tuition Changes
Public 4-Year Colleges and Universities: Price Changes at Public Research and Doctoral Institutions
Public 4-Year Colleges and Universities: Price Changes at Public Comprehensive and Baccalaureate Institutions
Public 4-Year Colleges and Universities: Price Changes by Student Income Level
Private Not-for-Profit 4-Year Colleges and Universities
Private Not-for-Profit 4-Year Colleges and Universities: Tuition Changes
Private Not-for-Profit 4-Year Colleges and Universities: Price Changes at Private Not-for-Profit Research and Doctoral Institutions
Private Not-for-Profit 4-Year Colleges and Universities: Price Changes at Private Not-for-Profit Comprehensive and Baccalaureate Institutions
Private Not-for-Profit 4-Year Colleges and Universities: Price Changes by Student Income Level
Public 2-Year Colleges
Public 2-Year Colleges: Tuition Changes
Public 2-Year Colleges: Price Changes
Public 2-Year Colleges: Price Changes by Student Income Level
Conclusions
Research Methodology
References
Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
Private Not-for-Profit 4-Year Colleges and Universities: Price Changes by Student Income Level

Examining price changes by income level revealed that total price and net price 1 (minus federal and state grants) increased across all income levels for students attending private not-for-profit research and doctoral institutions. Total price and net price 1 increased for middle- and high-income students attending comprehensive and baccalaureate institutions. When all grants were subtracted (net price 2), both middle- and high-income students at private not-for-profit research and doctoral institutions still faced an increase in price, while only middle-income students faced such an increase at private not-for-profit comprehensive and baccalaureate institutions. In other words, at private not-for-profit comprehensive and baccalaureate institutions, neither low-income nor high-income students faced a higher attendance price after all grants were subtracted, while at research and doctoral institutions, this was the case only for low-income students. After loans and grants were subtracted from total price (net price 3), only high-income students attending research and doctoral institutions paid a higher price of attendance.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education