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PEDAR: Executive Summary Persistence and Attainment of Beginning Students With Pell Grants
Introduction
Institution Type, Pell Grant Award Amounts, and Other Financial Aid
Academic Background and Enrollment Characteristics
Persistence Risk Factors
Three-Year Rates of Persistence
Persistence at 4-Year Institutions
Private Not-For-Profit 4-Year Institutions
Public 4-Year Institutions
Persistence at Less-Than-4-Year Institutions
Persistence of Pell Grant Recipients Receiving Other Financial Aid or Parental Support
Relationship of Specific Variables to Persistence
Research Methodology
References
Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
Introduction


Taking into account low- and middle-income students only, Pell Grant recipients were less well prepared academically than their counterparts who did not receive a Pell Grant. Among students enrolled at 4-year institutions, Pell Grant recipients were more likely than nonrecipients to have SAT I (or equivalent ACT) scores that fell in the lowest quartile and less likely to have completed a rigorous curriculum while in high school. Those attending less-than-4-year institutions were less likely than nonrecipients to have received a high school diploma (i.e., they did not graduate or they finished high school with a GED or high school completion certificate). Low- and middle-income Pell Grant recipients attending less-than-4-year institutions differed in some respects from nonrecipients in their educational objectives. Recipients at public 2-year institutions were more likely than nonrecipients to be pursuing an associate’s degree and less likely to be working toward a vocational certificate. Pell Grant recipients enrolled at private for-profit less-than-4-year institutions were more likely than nonrecipients to be pursuing no degree and less likely to be pursuing a vocational certificate.

Pell Grant recipients enrolled at public 2-year institutions also were more likely than nonrecipients to enroll full time and less likely to work while enrolled. This may be due in part to the Pell Grant program’s requirements. Both part-time attendance and income earned from employment can decrease eligibility for a Pell Grant.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education