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PEDAR: Executive Summary Teaching With Technology: Use of Telecommunications Technology by Postsecondary Instructional Faculty and Staff
Introduction
Access to the Internet, Quality of Computing Resources, and Use of Telecommunications Technologies
Access to the Internet
Quality of Computing Resources
Use of Telecommunications Technologies
Relationship of Internet Access and Quality of Computing Resources to Instructional Use of Technology
Teaching and Technology Use
Workload and Technology Use
Hours Worked
Work Activities
Classroom Contact Hours and Office Hours
Conclusion
Research Methodology
References
Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
Access to the Internet, Quality of Computing Resources, and Use of Telecommunications Technology - Relationship of Internet Access and Quality of Computing Resources to Instructional Use of Technology


Full- and part-time instructional faculty and staff who rated their institution’s computing resources as either good or excellent were much more likely to use e-mail to communicate with students in their classes than were those who rated their institution’s computing resources as poor. In addition, instructional faculty and staff’s use of e-mail to communicate with students in their classes and use of course-specific websites was associated with their level of access to the Internet. Those who had access both at home and at work were more likely to use e-mail and course-specific websites than those who had access only at work, had access only at home, or had no access. However, of those who had access to the Internet both at home and at work, full-time instructional faculty and staff were more likely to use e-mail to communicate with students in their classes (78 percent) than were their part-time counterparts (64 percent).

When taking into consideration the quality of computing resources, Internet access, and other academic and demographic characteristics of faculty, these variables accounted for 24 percent of the variance in faculty use of e-mail and 6 percent of the variance in faculty use of course-specific websites.3 When multivariate models were used to control for interrelationships among variables, postsecondary instructional faculty and staff who had access to the Internet both at home and at work were still more likely to use e-mail and course-specific websites than were those who had access only at home or only at work. Postsecondary instructional faculty and staff at 4-year doctoral institutions were also more likely to use e-mail and course-specific websites than were those at 4-year nondoctoral or 2-year institutions even when availability and quality of resources and other academic and demographic characteristics were taken into account.

Instructional faculty’s principal field of teaching was also related to use of telecommunications technologies, while controlling for the covariation among variables. With exception of four teaching fields (business, education, humanities, and social sciences), instructional faculty and staff who taught in the field of engineering and computer sciences were more likely to use e-mail than those who taught in other disciplines. Faculty who taught in engineering and computer sciences were also more likely than those who taught in other disciplines (except for business and vocational education) to use course-specific websites.

Finally, when taking the interrelationships among other variables into account, instructional faculty and staff who rated their institution’s computing resources as good or excellent were more likely to use course-specific websites than were those who rated the computing resources as poor. The likelihood of using e-mail and course-specific websites was also higher for instructional faculty and staff who taught both undergraduate and graduate students than for those who taught only undergraduates.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education