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PEDAR: Executive Summary Study of College Costs and Prices, 1989-89 to 1997-98
Introduction
Goals and limitations of the study
Study design and methodology
Findings and conclusions
Changes in tutition and other revenue sources over time
Changes in expenditures over time
Relationships of tuition changes with changes in revenues, expenditures, and other factors
Patterns in financial aid
Relationship of tuition changes with financial aid patterns
Usefulness of statistical models for testing relationships among revenues, costs, expenditures, and prices
Research Methodology
References
Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
Findings and conclusions: changes in tuition and other revenue sources over time

Patterns in financial aid differ considerably among the types of institutions (figure 5), yet some tendencies emerge within each broad institutional sector.

At public 4-year institutions, more than two-thirds of first-time, full-time, degree/certificate-seeking undergraduates received aid from any source, on average. The average percentages receiving aid and the average amounts received varied depending on the type of aid and the type of institution, but the highest figures were for student loan aid at all types of public 4-year institutions.

Public 2-year institutions presented a distinctly different situation. At these institutions, on average, 56.8 percent of first-time, full-time, degree/certificate-seeking undergraduates received aid from any source; the highest percentage and the highest average amount were for federal grant aid; and relatively low percentages of students received student loans or institutional aid.

At private not-for-profit 4-year institutions, about three-quarters of first-time, full-time, degree/certificate-seeking undergraduates received aid from any source, on average. The highest average percentages of students received institutional aid. Student loan aid was the second highest in terms of the average percentage of students receiving aid.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education