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PEDAR: Executive Summary Distance Education Instruction by Postsecondary Faculty and Staff: Fall 1998
Introduction
Instructional Faculty and Staff Teaching For-Credit Distance Classes
Workload and Compensation
Student/Faculty Interaction
Other Findings
Research Methodology
References
Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
Instructional Faculty and Staff Teaching For-Credit Distance Classes


Across the nation, about 6 percent of instructional faculty and staff who reported teaching one or more for-credit classes indicated that they taught at least one distance education class in fall 1998. Nine percent reported teaching at least one class primarily in a non–face-to-face mode—using a computer, TV-based, or other non–face-to-face medium. Those who taught distance education classes were considerably more likely than those who did not teach distance education classes to have also indicated that they taught non–face-to-face classes. Nevertheless, among those who did not teach distance education classes, about 6 percent indicated that they taught at least one class using a primarily non–face-to-face medium. Of those who did teach distance education classes, about one-third (36 percent) indicated that they taught only classes that used primarily face-to-face instruction (that is, identified their distance education classes as using primarily face-to-face instruction). This could occur when most of the students in a given class meet in a traditional classroom, but some students elect to take the same class via distance education.

Few demographic characteristics (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity), conditions of employment (e.g., full- or part-time status, academic rank, tenure status), or aspects of education and experience (e.g., highest degree attained, years in current job) were associated with either dimension of participation in distance education. Only institution type was associated both with teaching distance education classes and with teaching non–face-to-face classes: faculty at public 2-year institutions were more likely than those at private doctoral or liberal arts institutions to teach either type of distance class. For example, faculty at public 2-year institutions were more likely than their counterparts at private doctoral institutions to teach at least one non–face-to-face class (12 versus 6 percent).


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education