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PEDAR: Executive Summary Attrition of Neww Teachers Among Recent College Grads
Introduction
Data and Methodology
Results
Teaching and Teacher Attrition
Results
Professional Status of April Occupations
Multivariate Analysis
Summary
Research Methodology
References
Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
Relationship Between April Occupations and Postsecondary Fields of Study


Among those working as K–12 teachers in April 1994, nearly all reported that their jobs were related to the field they studied as undergraduates (97 percent among full-time teachers and 96 percent among part-time teachers). Similarly, among graduates who were working full time in April 1997, 93 percent of K–12 teachers reported that their jobs were somewhat or closely related to their graduate or undergraduate field of study. In both 1994 and 1997, the proportions of graduates employed full time in a health occupation or as engineers, scientists, or lab/research assistants who indicated that their jobs were related to their undergraduate major were similar to those of teachers.

Graduates who worked in many other occupations, however, were considerably less likely to report that their jobs were related to their undergraduate majors. In April 1994, graduates who worked in clerical, blue-collar, or sales/service occupations or as business owners or other managers were less likely than teachers to report that their jobs were related to their undergraduate majors: 72 percent or less of graduates in these occupations did so. Furthermore, among full-time employees, other instructors or human services personnel (88 percent) and business support or financial services personnel and computer/technical workers (81 percent each) were less likely than teachers to report that their jobs were related to their undergraduate fields of study.

Among graduates who were working full time in April 1997, 93 percent of K–12 teachers reported that their jobs were somewhat or closely related to their graduate or undergraduate field of study, a proportion similar to that among those working full time as an engineer, scientist, or lab/research assistant (93 percent) or in a health occupation (92 percent). In April 1997, full-time K–12 teachers among 1992–93 college graduates were more likely than those working in all other occupation categories except legal occupations and editors, writers, and artists to report that their jobs were related to their postsecondary fields of study.

As one might expect, graduates who reported that their April 1994 occupations were somewhat or closely related to their undergraduate fields of study were considerably less likely than those who reported that their 1994 occupations were not at all related to work in a different occupation in April 1997. Whereas 37 percent of graduates with jobs related to their field of study in 1994 worked in a different occupation 3 years later, 67 percent of those with unrelated jobs did so.

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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education