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PEDAR: Executive Summary Undergraduates with Higher Sticker Prices
Introduction
Student Characteristics
Finances
Influences
Academic Differences
Satisfaction
Persistence
Conclusion
Research Methodology
References
Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
Finances


Financial aid, work and parental support are the three major sources of financial support for undergraduates in both groups. Financial aid was received by 79 percent of the full-time, first-year undergraduates with higher sticker prices compared with 69 percent of those with sticker prices below $12,000 in public research universities. Part of the difference can be accounted for by the difference in probability of receiving federally provided financial aid. Sixty-one percent of the full-time, first-year undergraduates with higher sticker prices received federal financial aid compared with 48 percent of those with sticker prices below $12,000 in public research universities.

Full-time, first-year undergraduates with higher sticker prices were more likely to have received grants, loans, or work-study than were those with sticker prices below $12,000 in public research universities. The most striking difference is noted for college work-study, which one-third of the full-time, first-year undergraduates with higher sticker prices received, compared with 7 percent of those with sticker prices below $12,000 in public research universities.

The majority of full-time, first-year undergraduates in both groups worked while they attended school. Full-time, first-year undergraduates with higher sticker prices were more likely to work one to 14 hours a week, and those with sticker prices below $12,000 in public research universities were more likely to work 15 hours or more per week. Thirty-seven percent of those with higher sticker prices worked between one and 14 hours per week during the school year compared with 18 percent of those with sticker prices below $12,000 in public research universities. One-quarter of the full-time, first-year undergraduates with sticker prices below $12,000 in public research universities worked 15 to 29 hours compared with 16 percent of those with higher sticker prices. Ten percent of the full-time, first-year undergraduates with sticker prices below $12,000 in public research universities worked 30 hours or more compared with 7 percent of those with higher sticker prices.

Parents also provided financial support. Ninety-two percent of the full-time, first-year undergraduates with higher sticker prices received parental help compared with 80 percent of those with sticker prices below $12,000 in public research universities.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education