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School crime

Question:
Do you have any statistics on school crime?

Response:

The Crime and Safety Surveys Program collects and reports data on crime, violence, and safety in U.S. elementary and secondary schools. The following statistics are from the Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2015 report. The report is organized into sections that delineate specific concerns to readers, starting with a description of the most serious violent crimes. The sections cover violent deaths; nonfatal student and teacher victimization; school environment; fights, weapons, and illegal substances; fear and avoidance; discipline, safety, and security measures; and campus safety and security.

Violent Deaths at School

From July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2013, there were a total of 53 school-associated violent deaths in elementary and secondary schools in the United States. Of these 53 student, staff, and nonstudent school-associated violent deaths, there were 41 homicides, 11 suicides, and 1 legal intervention death.

Nonfatal Student Victimization–Student Reports

The rate of serious violent victimization against students ages 1218 was generally lower at school than away from school in most survey years between 1992 and 2008. Between 2009 and 2014, the rate at school was not measurably different from the rate away from school. The 2014 serious violent victimization rate for students ages 1218 did not differ measurably from the 2013 rate regardless of whether the location of victimization was at school or away from school. In 2014, students experienced about 4 serious violent victimizations per 1,000 students at school and 6 serious violent victimizations per 1,000 students away from school.

Between 1992 and 2014, total victimization rates for students ages 1218 generally declined both at school and away from school. The total victimization rate at school declined 82 percent, from 181 victimizations per 1,000 students in 1992 to 33 victimizations per 1,000 students in 2014. The total victimization rate away from school declined 86 percent, from 173 victimizations per 1,000 students in 1992 to 24 victimizations per 1,000 students in 2014.

Violence and Crime at School–Principal Reports

During the 201314 school year, 65 percent of public schools recorded that one or more violent incidents had taken place, amounting to an estimated 757,000 incidents. This figure translates to a rate of approximately 15 crimes per 1,000 students enrolled in 201314.

Violent incidents can be examined by the specific types of incidents that schools recorded. In 201314, about 58 percent of public schools reported one or more incidents of a physical attack or fight without a weapon. This percentage translates to approximately 453,000 incidents at a rate of about 9 crimes per 1,000 students. Some 47 percent of schools reported one or more incidents of threat of physical attack without a weapon (a rate of 6 crimes per 1,000 students).

Serious violent incidents are included within the total number of violent incidents, but can also be examined on their own. About 13 percent of public schools recorded one or more serious violent incidents in 201314 (a rate of 1 crime per 1,000 students). The types of serious violent incidents recorded included: threat of physical attack with a weapon (9 percent), robbery without a weapon (2 percent), physical attack or fight with a weapon (2 percent), sexual battery other than rape (2 percent), and rape or attempted rape (less than one half of 1 percent). Each type of serious violent incident translates to a rate of less than 1 crime per 1,000 students.

Teachers Threatened with Injury–Teacher Reports

During the 201112 school year, 9 percent of school teachers reported being threatened with injury by a student from their school. This percentage was lower than the 12 percent of teachers who reported being threatened with injury in 199394, but higher than the percentages of teachers who reported being threatened with injury in 200304 and 200708 (7 percent each). The percentage of teachers reporting that they had been physically attacked by a student from their school in 201112 (5 percent) was higher than in any previous survey year (ranging from 3 to 4 percent).

Perceptions of Personal Safety at School and Away From School–Student Reports

In 2013, about 3 percent of students ages 1218 reported that they were afraid of attack or harm at school or on the way to and from school during the school year. Similarly, 3 percent of students ages 1218 reported that they were afraid of attack or harm away from school during the school year.

Students' Reports of Illegal Drug Availability on School Property

The percentage of students in grades 912 who reported that illegal drugs were offered, sold, or given to them on school property increased from 1993 to 1995 (from 24 to 32 percent), but then decreased to 22 percent in 2013. The percentage of students who reported that illegal drugs were made available to them on school property was lower in 2013 than in 2011 (22 vs. 26 percent).

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2016). Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2015 (NCES 2016-079).


Percentage of students ages 1218 who reported criminal victimization at school during the previous 6 months, by type of victimization: Selected years, 1995 through 2013

The data in this figure is described in the surrounding text.

1 Serious violent crimes are also included in violent crimes.

NOTE: "Total victimization" includes theft and violent victimization. "Theft" includes attempted and completed purse-snatching, completed pickpocketing, and all attempted and completed thefts, with the exception of motor vehicle thefts. Theft does not include robbery, which involves the threat or use of force and is classified as a violent crime. "Serious violent victimization" includes the crimes of rape, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault. "Violent victimization" includes the serious violent crimes as well as simple assault. "At school" includes the school building, on school property, on a school bus, and, from 2001 onward, going to and from school. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and because students who reported both theft and violent victimization are counted only once in total victimization.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2016). Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2015 (NCES 2016-079), Figure 3.1.

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